Tag: currency report

CBP Confiscates $82K From International Traveler

U.S. Customs reports on a recent customs money seizure from a woman attempting to cross the border. Something tipped the customs officers off as she left the U.S. and put her through a secondary inspection where they found, lo and behold, $82,077. If this individual is not prosecuted by the government for criminal violations, she faces the  potentially difficult task of proving a legitimate source and legitimate intended use of the money. You can read our popular page on Responding to a Customs Money Seizure HERE.

Also, Customs gets the law wrong again, which now I am pretty sure they keep doing to get me worked up. The law only applies to “more than $10,000” not “$10,000 or more.” It’s the difference of a penny, but it’s still wrong to say $10,000 or more. Here is the story:

On Dec. 14, CBP officers working outbound operations at the Gateway International Bridge selected a white 1999 Cadillac Escalade for a secondary inspection. The driver, a 31-year-old female CBP Money SeizureU.S. citizen from Brownsville, was arrested after officers discovered packages containing unreported U.S. currency concealed within the Escalade. Officers removed and seized three packages

that contained [$82,077 in] U.S. currency which was allegedly was being taken into Mexico without being properly reported.

After CBP Field Operations arrested the adult female, she was turned over to agents with Homeland Security Investigations (HSI) for further investigation.

It is not a crime to carry more than $10,000, but it is a federal offense not to declare currency or monetary instruments totaling $10,000 or more to a CBP officer upon entry or exit from the U.S. or to conceal it with intent to evade reporting requirements. Failure to declare may result in seizure of the currency and/or arrest. An individual may petition for the return of currency seized by CBP officers, but the petitioner must prove that the source and intended use of the currency was legitimate.

In this case, we could give the woman the benefit of the doubt and presume the legitimate source is the proceeds of a decade worth of scrimping and saving; and the intended use, perhaps she is a very generous person and was going to buy Christmas presents in Mexico, with cash. Then Customs swoops in, seizes her money, and ruins all her plans. But, if we assume she proves these two things, then this situation is regrettable for him and completely avoidable. But now, even if criminal charges are ultimately not filed or if he is ultimately found not guilty of a crime, she will still face civil forfeiture of the money and, if he wants it back, will have to fight for its return administratively, or in the courts.

Our customs law firm handles currency/money seizures made by customs in Detroit and around the country; call (734) 855-4999 to consult with a customs lawyer today. If you have had money seized by Detroit CBP/customs call our office at (734) 855-4999 to speak to a lawyer, or e-mail us through our contact page (see our case results here). We are able to assist with cash seized by customs nationwide, including Detroit, Chicago, Atlanta, New York, Los Angeles, Las Vegas, and Orlando.

Please read these other articles on customs moneys eizures:

  1. Seizure of currency and monetary instruments by U.S. Customs
  2. Seizure for bulk cash smuggling into or out of the U.S.
  3. Structuring currency imports and exports
  4. Is it $10,000 per person?  Under what circumstances is filing a report with Customs for transporting more than $10,000 required?
  5. Criminal & civil penalties for failing to report monetary instrument transportation
  6. Is only cash currency subject to seizure by Customs?
  7. How do I get my seized money back from customs?
  8. Getting money seized by U.S. Customs back while staying overseas
  9. How long does it take Customs to decide a petition for a currency/monetary instrument seizure?
  10. Targeted Enforcement for Customs Money Seizures

 

CBP Seizes Currency after Admission of Structuring Violations

Lady luck, like fortune, is fickle. This man’s luck — and his casino winnings — disappeared at the border when he encountered Customs, who confiscated his winnings.

The guy had some cash from casino winnings confiscated by Customs while gambling in the Bahamas. He was en route to the United States, when he decided to break the law. Apparently fearing the unknown, he decided to divide the money up among 5 people so he would not have to file a currency report.That’s illegal structuring.

When Customs asked him why he divided up the money, he said it was so he did not have to file a currency report (FinCen 105). That’s an admission of illegal structuring. Law enforcement didn’t have to do any other work to confiscate casino winnings or hard earned money if you admit you violated the law.

Here are the details of the case of the “casino winnings” confiscated by Customs:

Nassau, BAHAMAS –U.S. Customs and Border Protection officers at the Nassau CBP Preclearance facility seized $63,851 in unreported currency from a U.S. citizen who was subsequently arrested by the Royal Bahamas Police Force, Dec. 8.

CBP officers at the Nassau Preclearance facility referred five male U.S. citizens for a secondary inspection after they each declared to be in possession of $9,000 U.S. dollars. Three men were en Customs Classification and Valuationroute to JFK and two men were en route to Newark.

Upon further questioning, one of the passengers admitted that he divided about $52,000 among his co-travelers in an attempt to circumvent currency reporting requirements. CBP officers were informed that the passengers’ currency was the result of legal casino winnings in the Bahamas. During the secondary inspection, CBP officers determined that the passenger who won the money in the casino also failed to declare the purchase of an $8,000 watch for which duty was assessed and collected.CBP officers seized a total of $63,851 in unreported currency.

“U.S. Customs and Border Protection officers provided this traveler multiple opportunities to accurately report all of his currency,” said Area Port Director for Nassau Preclearance Robert Allen Smith. “He ultimately admitted that he had divided his currency among his friends in an attempt to circumvent the law, and all of his currency was seized. The easiest way for travelers to hold on to their currency is to truthfully report it all to a CBP officer.”

The RBPF was notified of the false declaration and responded with interest to prosecute. The circumventing passenger was arrested by RBPF upon the conclusion of CBP seizure processing. RBPF took custody of the passenger and the evidence. The remaining four individuals were released without further incident.

So that it is, Customs confiscated the cash and then turned him over to the Royal Bahamas’ Police Force for prosecution. This is all the more of a sad story because there is nothing illegal about winning some money while gambling, and nothing illegal about bringing it into the United States. It’s very likely that this man could get the money out of Customs custody, but of course, he’ll still have to deal with the criminal charges from the RBPF.

Have you had casino winnings confiscated by Customs?

If you’ve had casino winnings confiscated by Customs you can learn more about the process from our trusted customs money seizure legal guide and can contact us for a free currency seizure consultation by clicking the contact buttons on this page.

 

U.S. Customs Seizes $69,000 in Cash at Preclearance Station from Traveler

Did you know U.S. Customs & Border Protection has preclearance stations in numerous foreign countries (link)? Did you know that if you fail to report currency at these preclearance stations it will be seized from you just as though you were going through U.S. Customs on U.S. soil? It’s apparently true, and here’s the story of a lady who had almost $70,000 seized for failure to report currency in excess of $10,000 while leaving the Bahamas destined for Fort Meyers, Florida.

NASSAU, Bahamas—U.S. Customs and Border Protection officers at the Nassau Preclearance facility discovered $69,739 in undeclared U.S. currency inside a traveler’s carry-on and checked luggage. The Royal Bahamas Police Force took custody of the traveler and the currency.Keep Calm and Declare Monetary Instruments Exceeding $10,000 USD

On Nov. 24, CBP officers encountered a 51-year-old female U.S. citizen traveling to Fort Myers, Florida. The subject was referred for a secondary baggage exam after Nassau Airport Authority Security alerted to a large sum of money inside a piece of checked luggage. During the baggage exam, CBP officers discovered several envelopes addressed to multiple people containing U.S. currency. The subject only reported $900 on her declaration and when questioned reaffirmed to CBP officers that she was traveling with less than $10,000. The traveler failed to formally report the money to CBP resulting in the seizure of the currency.

“This seizure is an excellent example of the cooperative working relationship U.S. Customs and Border Protection has with Nassau Airport Authority Security, who notified CBP of an anomaly in a bag,” said Robert Allen Smith, area port director for Nassau Preclearance. “CBP officers provided the traveler with multiple opportunities to accurately report all currency in her possession; however, she failed to comply with the reporting requirements. The easiest way for travelers to hold on to their currency is to truthfully report it all to a CBP officer.”

Individuals are permitted to carry any amount of currency or monetary instruments into or out of the United States. However, if the quantity is $10,000 or higher, they must formally report the currency to CBP. Failure to report may result in seizure of the currency and/or arrest.

It’s a somewhat intriguing for this customs lawyer, because 31 USC § 5316 requires that a “person . . . shall file a report . . . when the person . . . knowingly transports, is about to transport, or has transported, monetary instruments of more than $10,000 at one time . . . to a place in the United States from or through a place outside the United States”. The implementing regulation, 31 CFR § 1010.306, states that the report shall be filed “at the time of entry into the United States or at the time of departure . . .  from the United States, unless otherwise specified . . . .” At the time the regulation was drafted I don’t think the preclearance stations were contemplated. Thus, there might be a thin argument that there was no failure to report… but this is just me shooting from the hip. I haven’t done any time researching the issue and it should not be relied on anyone as legal advice.

Our customs law firm handles currency/money seizures made by customs in Detroit and around the country; call (734) 855-4999 to consult with a customs lawyer today (you can read our popular page on Responding to a Customs Money Seizure HERE).If you have had money seized by Detroit CBP/customs call our office at (734) 855-4999 to speak to a lawyer, or e-mail us through our contact page (see our case results here). We are able to assist with cash seized by customs nationwide, including Detroit, Chicago, Atlanta, New York, Los Angeles, Las Vegas, and Orlando.

Please read these other articles customs currency seizures:

  1. Seizure of currency and monetary instruments by U.S. Customs
  2. Seizure for bulk cash smuggling into or out of the U.S.
  3. Structuring currency imports and exports
  4. Is it $10,000 per person?  Under what circumstances is filing a report with Customs for transporting more than $10,000 required?
  5. Criminal & civil penalties for failing to report monetary instrument transportation
  6. Is only cash currency subject to seizure by Customs?
  7. How do I get my seized money back from customs?
  8. Getting money seized by U.S. Customs back while staying overseas
  9. How long does it take Customs to decide a petition for a currency/monetary instrument seizure?
  10. Targeted Enforcement for Customs Money Seizures

U.S. Customs Currency Seizures for Thanksgiving Travelers

Thanksgiving is apparently not the busiest travel day of the year, but it’s definitely one of the busiest. This year, with significant storm systems promising to delay flights at airports, Customs officers in the United States are going to have customs money seizuresome extra time on their hands detect which travelers are transporting more than $10,000 in money and not filing the required reports. We have written about some criteria Customs officers can use to target certain people for violating the currency reporting requirements in an article which you can READ BY CLICKING HERE.

You should protect yourself from seizure and ensure that you comply with all the laws related to entering or leaving the United States, but most especially for readers of this customs law blog, the currency reporting requirements for the United States. Increased travel for the holidays means increased opportunities for customs to seize your money for failing to report the transport of more than $10,000 into or out of the United States.

If it’s too late for you and you’ve had your money seized by Customs for failure to file a currency report, bulk cash smuggling, or a structuring violation, do not lose hope. It is possible for you to get your money back. You can find out more about how to get back seized currency by reading our article RESPONDING TO A CUSTOMS CURRENCY SEIZURE.

If you have had cash seized by customs and are contemplating what to do next, please make use of the other information available on this website or call our office at (734) 855-4999 to speak to a customs lawyer, or e-mail us through our contact page. We are able to assist with cash seized by customs around the country, including Chicago, Philadelphia, Atlanta, New York, Los Angeles, Miami, and many other places, and not just locally in Detroit.

Please read these other articles:

If you have had cash seized by customs and are contemplating what to do next, please make use of the other information available on this website or call our office at (734) 855-4999 to speak to a customs lawyer, or e-mail us through our contact page. We are able to assist with cash seized by customs around the country, including Chicago, Atlanta, New York, Los Angeles, Orlando and many other places, and not just locally in Detroit. Please read these other articles:

  1. Seizure of currency and monetary instruments by U.S. Customs
  2. Seizure for bulk cash smuggling into or out of the U.S.
  3. Structuring currency imports and exports
  4. Is it $10,000 per person?  Under what circumstances is filing a report with Customs for transporting more than $10,000 required?
  5. Criminal & civil penalties for failing to report monetary instrument transportation
  6. Is only cash currency subject to seizure by Customs?
  7. Responding to a Customs currency seizure
  8. How do I get my seized money back?
  9. Getting money seized by U.S. Customs back while staying overseas
  10. How long does it take Customs to decide a petition for a currency/monetary instrument seizure?
  11. Statute of Limitations for Currency Reporting Violations
  12. Filing a Petition for Seized Currency (with Sample and Tips) with CBP
  13. Don’t Talk About Your Customs Currency Seizure Case

“Strapped” for Cash? U.S. Customs Will Seize It!

In a currency seizure reported by U.S. Customs, customs seized $50,000 from a 25 year old man headed into Mexico and arrested him; although not specifically stated in the story, the money was probably arrested for bulk cash smuggling and failure to report, which carries with it criminal consequences. If this guy could prove the money came from a legitimate source and had a legitimate intended use, then this customs cash seizure was completely avoidable. Our customs law firm handles currency/money seizures made by customs in Detroit and around the country; call (734) 855-4999 to consult with a customs lawyer today (you can read our popular page on Responding to a Customs Money Seizure HERE).

 Here are the details from customs:

U.S. Customs and Border Protection officers at the San Ysidro port of entry Wednesday discovered $51,300 in unreported U.S. currency concealed underneath the clothing of a man traveling to Mexico on foot.

The incident occurred on November 4, at about 11:20 a.m., when CBP officers were conducting southbound inspections of travelers heading to Mexico through the San Ysidro port of entry. Officers targeted a 25-year-old male Bundled Currency Seized by U.S. CustomsU.S. citizen, and escorted him to a secure area for further examination.

U.S. Customs and Border Protection officers inspecting travelers walking south into Mexico at the San Ysidro port of entry found these bundles of cash strapped (pictured at right) to a 25-year-old male U.S. citizen.During the inspection, a CBP currency and firearms detector dog alerted to the man, leading officers to the discovery of eleven wrapped bundles of U.S. currency concealed underneath layers of his clothing.

The man, a resident of Hacienda Heights, California, was arrested and turned over to the custody of Homeland Security Investigations agents. He was later transported to the Metropolitan Correctional Center to await criminal arraignment. CBP seized the money.

It is a federal offense not to declare currency or monetary instruments totaling more than $10,000 to a CBP officer upon entry or exit from the U.S. or to conceal it with intent to evade reporting requirements. Failure to declare may result in seizure of the currency and/or arrest.

The fact that he was arrested might (but not necessarily does) indicate that customs believed he was transporting the money for some illegal purpose beyond just the smuggling/failure to report violation itself. Apparently the cash wasn’t wrapped good enough to get past the detetction dog‘s might impressive sense of smell.

If you have had money seized by Detroit CBP/customs call our office at (734) 855-4999 to speak to a lawyer, or e-mail us through our contact page (see our case results here). We are able to assist with cash seized by customs nationwide, including Detroit, Chicago, Atlanta, New York, Los Angeles, Las Vegas, and Orlando.

Please read these other articles customs currency seizures:

  1. Seizure of currency and monetary instruments by U.S. CustomsKeep Calm and Declare Monetary Instruments Exceeding $10,000 USD
  2. Seizure for bulk cash smuggling into or out of the U.S.
  3. Structuring currency imports and exports
  4. Is it $10,000 per person?  Under what circumstances is filing a report with Customs for transporting more than $10,000 required?
  5. Criminal & civil penalties for failing to report monetary instrument transportation
  6. Is only cash currency subject to seizure by Customs?
  7. How do I get my seized money back from customs?
  8. Getting money seized by U.S. Customs back while staying overseas
  9. How long does it take Customs to decide a petition for a currency/monetary instrument seizure?
  10. Targeted Enforcement for Customs Money Seizures

Customs Currency Smuggling Seizure

In this August story, Customs seized some U.S. Currency out-bound shipments because they were involved in currency smuggling (it’s worth mentioning that this story also styles it “unreported currency” like this one or that one or the one here). Like those stories, this cash is unreported, but more obviously, it is also smuggled. This is a little different than the usual customs money seizure case we handle, which are seizures of money at airports and land border crossings by customs (you can read our popular page on Responding to a Customs Money Seizure HERE).

IMPERIAL VALLEY, Calif. — U.S. Customs and Border Protection officers at the local ports of entry over the weekend foiled three attempts to smuggle 29 pounds of cocaine hidden in two wooden rocking horses, 752

customs cash seizure

prescription pills concealed in clothing, and $382,749 in unreported U.S. currency that was bound for Mexico.

[ . . . ]

The second incident occurred at about 7 a.m. on Aug. 16, when CBP officers were conducting southbound inspections of travelers heading to Mexico through the Calexico downtown border crossing. Officers targeted a 2001 Honda Accord and referred the driver, a 39-year-old Peruvian citizen, and his vehicle for a more in-depth examination.

While searching the vehicle, officers utilized the port’s imaging system and detected anomalies within the Accord’s rear quarter panels. Following an intensive search, officers extracted a total of 15 packages containing $382,749 in U.S. currency from inside the panels.

[ . . . ]

If you have had cash seized by customs and are contemplating what to do next call our office at (734) 855-4999 to speak to a customs lawyer, or e-mail us through our contact pageWe are able to assist with cash seized by customs around the country, including Chicago, Atlanta, New York, Los Angeles, Orlando and many other places, and not just locally in Detroit.

Read these other articles about customs money seizures:

  1. Seizure of currency and monetary instruments by U.S. Customs
  2. Customs currency seizure for bulk cash smuggling into or out of the U.S.
  3. Customs currency seizure; Structuring currency imports and exports
  4. Is it $10,000 per person?  Under what circumstances is filing a report with Customs for transporting more than $10,000 required?
  5. Criminal & civil penalties for failing to report monetary instrument transportation
  6. Is only cash currency subject to seizure by Customs?
  7. Getting money seized by U.S. Customs back while staying overseas
  8. How long does it take Customs to decide a petition for a currency/monetary instrument seizure?
  9. Customs currency seizure; Tuition Money Seized by Customs

Yet Another Seizure of Cash by Customs

This is a customs money seizure news release trifecta, where customs is reporting about some failed cash smuggling attempts — that are headline as “unreported funds” cases. The two previous stories are here (involving over $2M seized) and here (involving a 74 year old man). Like those stories, this is more about smuggled currency rather than just “unreported funds,” which is a bulk cash smuggling violation. This is a little different than the usual customs money seizure case we handle, which is the seizuresof money at the airport by customs (you can read our popular page on Responding to a Customs Money Seizure HERE).

On to this story:

TUCSON, Ariz. – A 19-year-old man from Pasco, Washington was arrested Oct. 6 for attempting to smuggle nearly $240,000 in unreported U.S. currency into Mexico through the Port of Nogales.

U.S. Customs and Border Protection officers conducting outbound inspections at the Dennis DeConcini crossing selected a Jaguar . . . for further inspection and found the unreported money hidden beneathCustoms Money Seizure the trunk’s undercarriage.

Officers processed the vehicle and currency for seizure, and referred Rodriguez to U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement’s Homeland Security Investigations.

If you have had cash seized by customs and are contemplating what to do next call our office at (734) 855-4999 to speak to a customs lawyer, or e-mail us through our contact pageWe are able to assist with cash seized by customs around the country, including Chicago, Atlanta, New York, Los Angeles, Orlando and many other places, and not just locally in Detroit.

Read these other articles about customs money seizures:

  1. Seizure of currency and monetary instruments by U.S. Customs
  2. Customs currency seizure for bulk cash smuggling into or out of the U.S.
  3. Customs currency seizure; Structuring currency imports and exports
  4. Is it $10,000 per person?  Under what circumstances is filing a report with Customs for transporting more than $10,000 required?
  5. Criminal & civil penalties for failing to report monetary instrument transportation
  6. Is only cash currency subject to seizure by Customs?
  7. Getting money seized by U.S. Customs back while staying overseas
  8. How long does it take Customs to decide a petition for a currency/monetary instrument seizure?
  9. Customs currency seizure; Tuition Money Seized by Customs

CBP Seized $109K in Unreported Funds

On the tails of our last currency seizure post (herecomes this story about an elderly Yuma, Arizona man concealing a total of nine packages of currency in his windshield cowling in an apparent effort to smuggle it out of the country and into Mexico. Like the last story, this is more about smuggled currency rather than just “unreported funds,” which is a bulk cash smuggling violation. This is a little different than the usual cases we handle, which are seizures of money by customs at the airport (but, you can read our popular page on Responding to a Customs Money Seizure HERE).

On to this story:

Tucson, Ariz. — A 74-year-old Yuma man was arrested Monday for attempting to smuggle nearly $109,000 in unreported U.S. currency into Mexico through the Port of Nogales.

Hidden Cash Seized by Customs

U.S. Customs and Border Protection officers conducting outgoing inspections referred a Ford SUV for further inspection at the Dennis DeConcini crossing and located nine packages of currency hidden within the windshield cowling.

Officers seized the unreported currency and referred the driver to U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement’s Homeland Security Investigations.

On Sept. 16, officers at the Mariposa crossing seized more than $189,000 found in the roof of a vehicle attempting to cross into Mexico.

If you have had cash seized by customs and are contemplating what to do next, please make use of the other information available on this website or call our office at (734) 855-4999 to speak to a customs lawyer, or e-mail us through our contact pageWe are able to assist with cash seized by customs around the country, including Chicago, Atlanta, New York, Los Angeles, Orlando and many other places, and not just locally in Detroit.

Read these other articles about customs money seizures:

  1. Seizure of currency and monetary instruments by U.S. Customs
  2. Customs currency seizure for bulk cash smuggling into or out of the U.S.
  3. Customs currency seizure; Structuring currency imports and exports
  4. Is it $10,000 per person?  Under what circumstances is filing a report with Customs for transporting more than $10,000 required?
  5. Criminal & civil penalties for failing to report monetary instrument transportation
  6. Is only cash currency subject to seizure by Customs?
  7. Getting money seized by U.S. Customs back while staying overseas
  8. How long does it take Customs to decide a petition for a currency/monetary instrument seizure?
  9. Customs currency seizure; Tuition Money Seized by Customs

Holiday Weekend Customs Cash Seizures

Many customs cash seizures by U.S. Customs & Border Protection (CBP) are bound to happen all over the country this weekend at airports and border crossings. The increased amount of travel for labor day weekend will be a big Customs Cash Seizurefactor, but most cash will be seized because as it is the start of the academic year. Foreign exchange students, graduate students, PhD candidates, visiting professors,  researchers, and other professionals employed or sponsored by universities will be arriving in the United States with their tuition money or money for living expenses, and if they fail to report it to customs, it will be seized before they ever get a chance to use it. Get the details: Tuition Money Seized by Customs.

It does not matter that the money is legitimate. It only matters that there is a failure to make an accurate report to customs about how much money is transported. This reporting process usually starts by properly filling out your customs declaration form on arrival. Failure to properly report more than $10,000 transported into or out the country will result in a customs cash seizure. As we explained in previous articles, customs knows how to target arriving passengers to find people who might have money (Read: Targeting Customs Seizure Enforcement). If you are reading this after you already had a customs cash seizure then this article will tell you what to expect: Responding to a Customs currency seizure.

You can get your money back, but it will take time and effort. If you file a petition for remission, customs will require proof of the source of the money and its intended use. Customs has stringent requirements for getting your money back. They have specific documentation requirements depending on the country the money came from. Although the process is difficult and time consuming, it is almost always worth trying to get your money back. There is no customs cash seizure case that is hopeless, even if the documentation is missing or unavailable! For the best chances of success, you should hire a customs lawyer with a track record of successfully getting seized currency back from customs.

We are that experienced customs lawyer. If you have had your tuition money seized by customs, call us at (734) 855-4999 or contact us HERE because Great Lakes Customs Law can help.

Read these other articles about customs cash seizures:

  1. Seizure of currency and monetary instruments by U.S. Customs
  2. Customs cash seizure for bulk cash smuggling into or out of the U.S.
  3. Customs cash seizure; Structuring currency imports and exports
  4. Is it $10,000 per person?  Under what circumstances is filing a report with Customs for transporting more than $10,000 required?
  5. Criminal & civil penalties for failing to report monetary instrument transportation
  6. Is only cash currency subject to seizure by Customs?
  7. Getting money seized by U.S. Customs back while staying overseas
  8. How long does it take Customs to decide a petition for a currency/monetary instrument seizure?
  9. Customs cash seizure; Tuition Money Seized by Customs

Outbound Customs Currency Seizures to Mexico

This customs currency seizure story, quoted below from U.S. Customs & Border Protection (full story HERE), illustrates the currency reporting requirement for arriving traveler’s and for those exiting the country. Failure to follow the law will result in a customs currency seizure.Customs Currency Seizure Lawyer; Keep Calm and Declare Monetary Instruments Exceeding $10,000 USD

IMPERIAL VALLEY, Calif. — U.S. Customs and Border Protection officers at the local ports of entry over the weekend foiled three attempts to smuggle . . . $382,749 in unreported U.S. currency that was bound for Mexico. [ . . . ]

The [ ] incident occurred at about 7 a.m. on Aug. 16, when CBP officers were conducting southbound inspections of travelers heading to Mexico through the Calexico downtown border crossing. Officers targeted a 2001 Honda Accord and referred the driver, a 39-year-old Peruvian citizen, and his vehicle for a more in-depth examination.

While searching the vehicle, officers utilized the port’s imaging system and detected anomalies within the Accord’s rear quarter panels. Following an intensive search, officers extracted a total of 15 packages containing $382,749 in U.S. currency from inside the panels.

If you have a customs currency seizure case and are contemplating what to do next, please use the information available on this website or call our office at (734) 855-4999 to speak to a customs lawyer, or e-mail us through our contact page. We are able to assist with cash seized by customs around the country, including Detroit, Chicago, Atlanta, New York, Los Angeles, Orlando and many other places.

Please read these customs currency seizure articles:

  1. Seizure of currency and monetary instruments by U.S. Customs
  2. Seizure for bulk cash smuggling into or out of the U.S.
  3. Structuring currency imports and exports
  4. Is it $10,000 per person?  Under what circumstances is filing a report with Customs for transporting more than $10,000 required?
  5. Criminal & civil penalties for failing to report monetary instrument transportation
  6. Is only cash currency subject to seizure by Customs?
  7. Responding to a Customs currency seizure
  8. How do I get my seized money back?
  9. Getting money seized by U.S. Customs back while staying overseas
  10. How long does it take Customs to decide a petition for a currency/monetary instrument seizure?