Tag: detroit

The CBP global entry line at Detroit Metropolitan Airport.

Detroit Metro Airport CBP Seize $59,451 Cash

Finally, a CBP cash seizure press release from my own home port of Detroit that happened at Detroit Metropolitan Airport, which is just a few miles down the road from our office. This one involves a U.S. citizen returning from China with his wife; together, the couple was found to be transporting more than $10,000 cash through Customs…. about $50,000 more, actually.

Here’s the full story from Detroit CBP:

DETROITOn November 28, 2016, U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP), Office of Field Operations at the Detroit Metropolitan Airport seized $59,451 in U.S. currency from a United States citizen after he failed to report the currency to CBP officers. The traveler is a member of the Global Entry trusted traveler program.

The male traveler and his wife arrived in Detroit on a flight from Beijing, China. He initially denied carrying $10,000 or more in U.S. currency or its equivalent in foreign currency. CBP Officers questioned the traveler as he and his wife attempted to exit the federal inspection area separately 13 minutes apart. Further inspection led to the discovery of $59,451 divided between the two.

“You must report to CBP that you are carrying $10,000 or more in U.S. dollars or equivalent foreign currency or other monetary instruments when you travel into or out of the United States, especially if you are a member of Global Entry.” said Devin Chamberlain, CBP Detroit (Airport) Port Director. “There is no limit as to how much currency travelers can import or export. However, the law requires travelers to report when they carry at least $10,000 in monetary instruments.  Violators may face criminal prosecution and forfeiture of the undisclosed funds.”

As you can see, this story involves both a failure to report cash to customs and unlawful cash structuring. As we’ve explained time and time again at this customs law blog, cash will be seized by Detroit CBP if it is divided between a husband and wife (or other family members) traveling together and CBP has cause to believe it was done for the purpose of avoiding filing the currency report on form FinCen 105.

Had cash seized at Detroit Metro Airport by CBP?

If you’re like the people in this story and have suffered a cash seizure by U.S. Customs & Border Protection (CBP) at Detroit Metro Airport, you’re in need of a lawyer to help you get your money back and potentially avoid criminal prosecution or inquiry. Every case is different and nuances, exceptions and interpretations are almost always present making each case unique and challenging. Many people need help even understanding the election of proceedings form that is included with the notice of seizure.

Please make use of our customs currency seizure legal guide, but remember to also take advantage of our free currency seizure consultation by contacting us today by clicking on the contact button!

Notice of Seizure and Intent to Forfeit (CAFRA) at the Port of Detroit

Structured Cash Seized by CBP Detroit

Last week, CBP posted another round of notices of seizure and intents to forfeit on their website, forfeiture.gov. Among the many thousands of items seized and subject to forfeiture is $19,300, in cash seized at Detroit Metropolitan Airport in Romulus, Michigan, on August 23, 2016.

Like all notices on forfeiture.gov, it is sparse on detail; but, we do know that it was seized for both a failure to report and unlawful cash structuring, which likely means that more than 1 person was traveling with the money; or that CBP took two family members or traveling companions, pulled them aside, found that each was traveling with slightly less than $10,000, and grouped the amounts together and is accusing one person of giving the money to another so as to avoid filing the currency transaction report on Form FinCen105.

PUBLICATION/POSTING START: October 14, 2016
PUBLICATION/POSTING END: November 13, 2016
DEADLINE TO FILE A CLAIM: December 13, 2016

DETROIT, MI

2016380700111101-001-0000, Seized on 08/23/2016; At the port of DETROIT, MI; U.S. CURRENCY RETAINED; 247; EA; Valued at $19,300.00; For violation of  31USC5316, 31USC5317, 31USC5324, 31CFR1010.340(A)

The reason the notice of seizure was published on the website is because either the recipient decided to abandon the money, did not receive the personal CAFRA notice of seizure letter, or messed up the petition (unlikely in the span of 7 weeks since the seizure occurred). Don’t make that same mistake, and hire a customs lawyer for any cash, money, or monetary instrument seizure you experienced at the hands of U.S. Customs & Border Protection.

Have you had structured cash seized by CBP Detroit?

If you had structured cash seized by CBP Detroit, you can learn more about the process from our trusted customs money seizure legal guide and can contact us for a free currency seizure consultation by clicking the contact buttons on this page.

CBP checkpoint at the Detroit-Windsor Tunnel border crossing, with vehicles in the foreground.

Detroit & Chicago Cash Forfeiture Notices

There have not been any CBP news releases recently about cash seizures conducted by U.S. Customs & Border Protection, but that does not mean CBP has stopped seizing cash. Far from it, in fact. For example, there are only a couple (if that) of cash seizure news releases from the Port of Detroit each year, yet last year they were #2 in cash seizures nationwide.

Once cash is seized by CBP, a person has several options to try to get it back (or to not get it back), most of which are on the election of proceedings form. If they aren’t successful, don’t try to get the money back, or file a claim, the publication of the notice of seizure and intent to forfeit is published online for all the world to see and, if interested, to make a claim for the seized cash.

Case in point, on November 20, 2015, at the land border crossing between Detroit and Canada $14,000 cash was seized by U.S. Customs & Border Protection for a failure to report. Because the seizure occurred last November and is only now being published, it is very likely that the administrative resolution was unsuccessful.

That usually means a bad lawyer, no lawyer, or insufficient documentation showing legitimate source and use of the seized cash.

DETROIT, MI
2016380100013401-001-0000, Seized on 11/20/2015; At the port of DETROIT, MI; $14000 IN USD; 140; EA; Valued at $14,000.00; For violation of 31USC5317, 31USC5316, 31CFR1010.340(A)

Now even though Detroit has more CBP cash seizures than Chicago for violating the reporting requirements, Chicago CBP seizes a lot of cash seizures for alleged criminal violations, including money laundering:

CHICAGO, IL
2016390100098701-001-0000, Seized on 08/11/2016; At the port of CHICAGO, IL; U.S. CURRENCY; 1,344; EA; Valued at $31,000.00; For violation of 18USC981, 18USC1956, 21USC881

2016390100098901-001-0000, Seized on 08/10/2016; At the port of CHICAGO, IL; U.S. CURRENCY; 176; EA;Valued at $4,000.00; For violation of 18USC981, 18USC1956, 21USC881

Now, I would love to know if these were seized from people traveling internationally, or just people traveling within the United States. If seized while traveling internationally, because there is no cited violation of the reporting requirement (or bulk cash smuggling or structuring laws), I would imagine either the money was truly reported but Customs suspected (or knew of…) a connection to illegal activity; or, the connection to illegal activity was so strong they chose not to allege a violation of the reporting requirements laws under Title 31.

Has Chicago or Detroit CBP seized your cash?

If CBP in Chicago or Detroit seized your cash, you need a lawyer. Read our trusted customs money seizure legal guide and can contact us for a free currency seizure consultation by clicking the contact buttons on this page. Our new, Chicago customs law office is located at 150 S. Wacker Drive, where we can be reached at (773) 920-1840.
Notice of Seizure and Intent to Forfeit (CAFRA) at the Port of Detroit

Detroit CBP Seizes $10,005 in Cash at DTW

Press releases from CBP about cash seizures have been slow for the past several weeks, but there are still plenty of people getting money seized and lots of forfeiture actions being published on forfeiture.gov, like the following case where slightly more than $10,000 was seized at Detroit Metropolitan Airport on June 16:

2016380700087701-001-0000, Seized on 06/16/2016; At the port of DETROIT, MI; U.S. CURRENCY RETAINED; 101; EA; Valued at $10,005.00; For violation of 31USC5317, 31USC5316, 31CFR1010.340(A)

What a bummer for this person; he had another $5 with him that took him the category of people who do not have to file the currency report, to the category of people that must file. My guess is that he knew the reporting limit was $10,000, so that’s all he took with him (which could be a structuring violation, anyway); but he probably forgot about a $5 bill in the fold of his wallet, or in the pocket of his luggage. This is technically – legally – a violation of the reporting law. Of course, Detroit Customs seized his cash.

Sometimes they let people amend their report, sometimes they do not. I’ve had clients who’ve had money seized in same detention area with someone who, also failing to report, have not had money seized. I presume the decision to seize is dependent on the facts and circumstances of the seizure, and it is not just entirely arbitrary and capricious. I would really, really, like to believe that.

If you are traveling with $10,000.01 or more, you must file a currency report with CBP. If he was traveling with $10,000, no report was necessary. But, because he had $10,005, he had to file a currency seizure report.

Has Detroit CBP seized your cash?

If Detroit CBP has seized your cash, you need a lawyer. Read our trusted customs money seizure legal guide and can contact us for a free currency seizure consultation by clicking the contact buttons on this page.

Notice of Seizure and Intent to Forfeit (CAFRA) at the Port of Detroit

CBP Detroit Cash Forfeitures for 7-29-16

Last Friday’s notice of seizure and intent to forfeit for U.S. Customs & Border Protection featured 3 currency seizures that occurred in 3 separate incidents on June 2 and June 9, with a total seizure value of $72,338.

The seizure on June 2 for $40,080, was for a failure to report cash to Detroit CBP and for bulk cash smuggling:

2016380700084501-001-0000, Seized on 06/02/2016; At the port of DETROIT, MI; US CURRENCY RETAINED; 403; EA; Valued at $40,080.00; For violation of 31USC5317, 31USC5316, 31CFR1010.340(A), 31USC5332

The seizures on June 9, one for $17,657, was for a failure to report; the other, for $14,601, was for failure to report cash to Detroit CBP and for an unlawful cash structuring violation.

2016380700086001-001-0000, Seized on 06/09/2016; At the port of DETROIT, MI; US CURRENCY RETAINED; 186; EA; Valued at $17,657.00; For violation of 31USC5317, 31USC5316, 31CFR1010.340(A), 31USC5324

2016380700086101-001-0000, Seized on 06/09/2016; At the port of DETROIT, MI; U.S. CURRENCY RETAINED; 175; EA; Valued at $14,601.00; For violation of 31USC5317, 31USC5316, 31CFR1010.340(A), 31USC5324

As with most cases that are posted up on forfeiture.gov, the publication of the intent to forfeit the property likely represents a total failure on the part of the person whose money was seized to successfully navigate the process for getting seized back from Detroit CBP.  Administrative forfeiture is a last resort and also has the worst outcome in most cases; if any money is recovered at all, it is often far, far less than would be recovered through the administrative petition process. But, whether to file a claim or an administrative petition is a decision that should be made in consultation with your attorney.

Due to how quickly people have money seized and the representations of the seizing officers, people mistakenly believe that getting seized money back from Detroit CBP is an easy process.

Instead, it is fraught with difficulties and unforeseen challenges. Instead of risking forfeiture and the total loss of your money, do the smart thing and call us for a free currency seizure consultation and make use of the free customs money seizure legal guide we publish on this website.

Another Detroit CBP cash seizure abandoned

Earlier on July 2, CBP Detroit posted a notice of intent to forfeit $20,728 that was seized at Detroit Metropolitan Airport (port code 3807) on June 20, 2016, for a simple failure to report more than $10,000 being brought into the country or out of the country, as required by currency reporting laws.

The fact that publication has already begun for this recent seizure is probably unfortunate. It means that someone has chosen to abandon their money or has never received a personal notice of seizure letter from CBP. After the seizure notice letter is mailed, CBP can begin administrative forfeiture proceedings after 35 days have passed.

Someone with an interest in the property can file a claim based on the publication of the notice of intent to forfeit; however, if the person received a personal notice of seizure letter, legally speaking, the deadline for filing a claim will have already passed. Don’t let that fact discourage you from contacting our office, because sometimes there are ways around this bar to filing a claim.

Here’s the notice:

PUBLICATION/POSTING START: July 02, 2016
PUBLICATION/POSTING END: August 01, 2016
DEADLINE TO FILE A CLAIM: August 31, 2016

DETROIT, MI

2016380700088501-001-0000, Seized on 06/20/2016; At the port of DETROIT, MI; U.S. CURRENCY RETAINED;220; EA; Valued at $20,728.00; For violation of 31USC5317, 31USC5316, 31CFR1010.340(A)

I’ve seen some lawyers out there say never to bother filing an administrative petition cash seized by a federal agency; to always file a claim.

We have always had tremendous success in negotiating return of the money through the filing of administrative petitions for our clients who have had their money seized by CBP, especially in Detroit. So do not be fooled my lawyers who try to pressure you into filing a claim so they can charge you higher legal fees by filing a claim.

If you got currency seized by CBP you can learn more about the process from our trusted customs money seizure legal guide and can contact us for a free currency seizure consultation by clicking the contact buttons on this page.

A copy of the notice of seizure and intent to forfeit featuring the case of the incomplete check seized by CBP

Incomplete Checks Seized by CBP in Detroit

On May 10, someone at the land border between Detroit and Canada attempted to bring into or leave the country with a check for $50,000 that was blank – in that it did not have a payee — in other words, the payee in the “pay to the order of” section of the check was blank. That’s what you call an “incomplete instrument” in legal-speak, or we’ll call it an incomplete check for our purposes.

Incomplete checks fall under the general monetary instrument reporting requirements that Customs enforces at all ports of entry through the United States. In fact, incomplete checks are specifically identified as being part of the monetary instruments that must be reported to customs, apart from cash. 31 CFR 1010.100(dd)(iv) states the monetary instruments include ….”incomplete instruments (including personal checks, business checks, official bank checks, cashier’s checks, third-party checks, promissory notes (as that term is defined in the Uniform Commercial Code), and money orders) signed but with the payee’s name omitted“.

So Last Friday, U.S. Customs & Border Protection at the Port of Detroit noticed its seizure and intention to forfeit a check (a/k/a a negotiable instrument) valued at $50,000. The notice is as follows:

PUBLICATION/POSTING START: June 24, 2016
PUBLICATION/POSTING END: July 23, 2016
DEADLINE TO FILE A CLAIM: August 23, 2016

2016380100064801-001-0000, Seized on 05/10/2016; At the port of DETROIT, MI; CHECK (SIGNED WITHOUT PAYEE); 1; EA; Valued at $50,000.00; For violation of 31USC5317, 31USC5316, 31CFR1010.340(A)

I bet this person thought they could get around the reporting requirement by not completing the payee on the check, just like the many people who think they can get around the reporting requirement by dividing the money through structuring.

They might also be under the mistaken impression that they will cancel the check, and CBP will not be able to keep the $50,000. But that is not what happens when CBP seizes a check; after seizure, CBP can “freeze” those funds in the bank account, or by otherwise getting access to the money, and by getting cooperation from the bank itself. Be warned.

Have you had a check seized by CBP?

If you have had a check seized by CBP you can learn more about the process from our trusted customs money seizure legal guide and can contact us for a free currency seizure consultation by clicking the contact buttons on this page.

An image of 11 counterfeit championship rings that were seized by Detroit U.S. Customs & Border Protection at Detroit Metropolitan airport.

Detroit CBP Seizes $680k in Counterfeit Championship Rings

CBP at Detroit Metro Airport seized $680,000 worth of counterfeit championship rings that were being imported into the United States from China. This counterfeit seizure by happened in April, but it is just now making the news.

That’s probably because the story finally made it from FP&F to CBP’s press department, or because the notice of seizure was finally mailed after a final determination by CBP that the rings were actually counterfeit. A valuation of $680,000 means that Customs is putting an MSRP value on each ring of $5,000.

Recall that each time you cause an importation of a counterfeit item into the United States it subject to seizure and you are subject to a penalty, as the importer, for up to the value of the goods if they were real. You can read more about that in our other articles on that topic: Importing Counterfeit Trademarks – Customs Seizures & Penalties; Part 1 and Part 2  (click to read).

The use of a fictitious name by the importer opens the importer up to additional liability beyond merely violation 19 USC 1526(e) (importing counterfeits), by charges involving fraud. Not a smart move. Here’s the story:

DETROIT— In late April, U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP), Office of Field Operations at the Detroit Metropolitan Airport seized $680,000 (MSRP) in counterfeit NHL, NFL and MLB championship rings in a shipment that originated on a flight from China.

While conducting operations at a DHL consignment facility, the Cargo Enforcement Team selected and examined a shipment of rings from China, resulting in the discovery of 136 counterfeit championship rings from the National Football League, National Hockey League and Major League Baseball. In all, the counterfeit rings displayed the names and logos of several teams such as the Dallas Cowboys, Pittsburgh Steelers, New York Giants, Oakland Raiders, New Orleans Saints, and New York Jets. The shipment also included rings for the Chicago Black Hawks and the Boston Red Sox.

The company identified as the receiver of the rings used a fictitious name and was found to have previous copyright/trademark violations.

Have you had allegedly counterfeit merchandise seized by CBP in Detroit?

Not only do you have rights to contest the determination that the merchandise was counterfeit (like getting a sample of seized merchandise), but if you’ve been penalized we are very successful in getting penalties reduced or eliminated entirely. Click the contact button on this page to get in touch with us today!

Back-to-back Detroit airport money seizures are listed in this May 27 Notice of Seizure and Intent to Forfeit published by CBP

Back to back Detroit airport money seizures

Detroit CBP seized a total $40,249 in back-to-back money seizures at Detroit airport on March 29, 2016 for failure to report and illegal cash structuring. The excerpt from the notice of seizure and intent to forfeit gives only the most essential information that allows for someone with an interest in the property to file a claim.

The fact that administrative forfeiture proceedings have begun (as signified by the fact it is being published in this way on forfeiture.gov) probably represents a bad decision by the people who experienced the Detroit airport money seizures, or by their attorney. Immigration attorneys and general practitioners have no business doing the work of a customs lawyer in responding to a money seizure by CBP at Detroit airport or elsewhere.

What are some reasons people choose the administrative forfeiture route?

It could be lack of evidence to prove legitimate source or intended use, failure to actually receive the personal notice of seizure letter, fear of criminal repercussions, failure to understand the difference between the different election of proceedings options… and other reasons related to ignorance of the law about money seizures.

Here’s the excerpt from CBP’s forfeiture.gov posting:

PUBLICATION/POSTING START:
PUBLICATION/POSTING END:
DEADLINE TO FILE A CLAIM:

May 27, 2016
June 25, 2016
July 26, 2016

2016380700066701-001-0000, Seized on 03/29/2016; At the port of DETROIT, MI; US CURRENCY RETAINED; 265; EA; Valued at $20,558.00; For violation of 31USC5317,31USC5316,31CFR1010.340(A),31USC5324

2016380700067101-001-0000, Seized on 03/29/2016; At the port of DETROIT, MI; U.S. CURRENCY RETAINED; 235; EA; Valued at $19,691.00; For violation of 31USC5317,31USC5316,31CFR1010.340(A),31USC5324

Have you experienced a Detroit airport money seizure?

If you experienced a Detroit airport money seizure by U.S. Customs & Border Protection  you can learn more about the process from our trusted customs money seizure legal guide and can contact us for a free currency seizure consultation by clicking the contact buttons on this page.

Detroit CBP returns Canadian dollars concealed within a book

Detroit CBP Returns Canadian Dollars

The requirement to report cash to Customs applies not only to U.S. currency, but also to foreign currency (among other monetary instruments). Detroit CBP returned $4,000 Canadian dollars to a man who attempted to send the money into the United States to avoid detection, in a kind of reversal of how the forfeiture and seizure process usually works. Bear with as I explain.

If I understand the story correctly, Customs intercepted a package that was shipped from an elderly person in Canada that contained a book. Inside the pages of the book was placed Canadian currency. The cash was put in the book in such a way as to avoid detection. The recipient address of the book/cash in the United States has previously been associated with fraudulent identification sales.

Detroit CBP returns Canadian dollars concealed within a book
Detroit CBP returns Canadian dollars

And that’s where the story gets interesting. Though the sender of the book is the person who violated the law (by attempting to smuggle currency into the United States in the pages of a book and by failing to declare the shipment’s true contents), CBP is apparently returning the money to the sender because he was the victim of a scam that targets elderly people.

Kudos to Detroit CBP on this one. Although I have occasion to disagree with their seizure policies and enforcement techniques on occasion, this time it seems they’ve really cut through a black-and-white/good-vs-bad interpretation of the law and are returning the money to its owner, without need for a formal seizure and forfeiture process.

Want Detroit CBP to return your Canadian dollars?

If you want Detroit CBP to return your Canadian dollars you can learn more about the process from our trusted customs money seizure legal guide and can contact us for a free currency seizure consultation by clicking the contact buttons on this page.