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Targeted Enforcement for Customs Money Seizure

How does customs target people for money seizures?

There are certain groups of people who are more likely to be transporting large amounts of money through airport customs. For example, people who come from largely cash based economies and people who for cultural reasons, do not trust banks or prefer to pay with and keep cash on hand. Walking around with more than $10,000 in cash is hard for a lot of Americans to understand because credit is easy and we are notoriously bad savers. I suspect many American’s would not think twice about having a $10,000 balance on their credit card, but those same people would be shocked to hear about someone walking around with $10,000 in cash.

Another example of people who are more likely to be transporting large amounts of money through customs are those travelling to the U.S. for an extended vacation or are staying for a long time to attend a university, work an internship, or immigrate from China, Korea, Iran or Indonesia, for example, and make a permanent residence in the United States . They might be carrying money with them to pay for tuition (which usually cannot be paid by credit card), books, expenses related to renting an apartment, buying car, purchasing health insurance, etc.

Why does customs target certain groups for money seizures?

From the perspective of customs, targeted enforcement of the more than $10,000 currency reporting requirement makes sense and any diligent customs officer who wants to make sure the currency reporting laws are enforced is going to target certain people de-planing from flights from certain countries or parts of the world.

Extended vacationers are easy to target by customs. Customs may review your itinerary (e.g., one way or return flight) and ask about the purpose of your visit to the United States. So when a customs officer asks, “How long are you staying in the United States?” and the response is, “A month,” one of the next few questions likely to be asked is going be, “And so how much money are you travelling with?” If you look nervous, or if they just do not believe you, there are likely going to search you and your luggage in a secondary inspection to verify whatever you tell them about how much money you are transporting.

What’s an example of a group targeted by customs for currency reporting purposes?

The Chinese New Year is coming up (1/31 to 2/6) and traditionally, Chinese people visit relatives and give cash gifts in red envelopes, called hongbao, during this holiday. You can read more about

Red Envelope (hongbao) Customs Money Seizure
Cash Filled Hongbao – Red Envelopes

this interesting cultural practice at Wikipedia. Chinese people living in the United States also celebrate the Chinese New Year. Chinese nationals travel to the United States to visit their family living here and bring with them hongbao red envelopes stuffed with cash from relatives back in China. It might be in certain “lucky” denominations, it might be for a wedding, a new baby, or just to help a young family out.

As a result, Customs might target flights from China for enhanced enforcement of the currency reporting requirement near and during the Chinese New Year and seize money for failure to report, bulk cash smuggling, or structuring violations (multiple red envelopes being transported on behalf of multiple relatives). Chinese nationals coming to the United States during the Chinese New year celebrations are probably going to be targeted by customs to make sure that they are reporting any amount over $10,000 in currency they are transporting into the United States, or if they fail to report, customs will seize their money and tell them to file a petition to get it back.

Customs seized my money! What do I do now?

If you have had money seized by customs please make use of the other information available on this website or call our office at (734) 855-4999 to speak to a customs lawyer, or e-mail us through our contact page. We are able to assist with cash seized by customs around the country, including Chicago, Atlanta, New York, Los Angeles, Las Vegas, Orlando and many other places, and not just locally in Detroit.

Please read these other articles from our customs law blog:

  1. Seizure of currency and monetary instruments by U.S. Customs
  2. Seizure for bulk cash smuggling into or out of the U.S.
  3. Structuring currency imports and exports
  4. Is it $10,000 per person?  Under what circumstances is filing a report with Customs for transporting more than $10,000 required?
  5. Criminal & civil penalties for failing to report monetary instrument transportation
  6. Is only cash currency subject to seizure by Customs?
  7. Responding to a Customs currency seizure
  8. How do I get my seized money back?
  9. Getting money seized by U.S. Customs back while staying overseas
  10. How long does it take Customs to decide a petition for a currency/monetary instrument seizure?

 

Philly CBP Seizes a Combined $96K from Two Women Heading to Jamaica on Consecutive Days

A sure way to ruin your vacation to Jamaica is by failing to correctly report the amount of currency you are transporting from the United States. Any failure to report, or mis-report, of the amount of currency you transport makes the currency subject to seizure and forfeiture. Customs released some details of some unlucky travellers who had their money confiscated by customs:

Philadelphia — U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) officers seized a combined $96,683 from two women heading to Jamaica on consecutive days this weekend for violating federal currency reporting regulations.

CBP officers stopped the first woman as she attempted to board a flight to Montego Bay Saturday. CBP officers explained federal currency reporting regulations to the woman and

 

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she reported that she possessed $4,900. A CBP examination of both the woman’s carry-on bag and her checked luggage revealed a total of $65,643, including some currency concealed inside children’s shoes.

The following day, CBP officers stopped another woman boarding the Montego Bay-bound flight. After CBP officers explained the currency reporting regulations, the woman reported $5,000 to $6,000. She then removed an envelope from her carry-on bag that contained $10,700. CBP officers then discovered an additional $13,340 in the woman’s carry-on bag. The woman then admitted that there was additional currency in her checked luggage. CBP officers counted a total of $31,040

Neither woman was criminally charged. CBP officers seized the currency and released the women.

There is no limit to how much currency that travelers can bring into, or take out of the United States. Travelers are required to formally report amounts of $10,000 or more [NOTE: Wrong again, it is more than $10,000] in U.S. dollars, equivalent foreign currency, or other monetary instruments.

“These are two very expensive lessons that these women learned, and we hope that this experience entices other travelers to truthfully report to Customs and Border Protection officers the total amount of currency that they bring to the U.S., or intend to take from the U.S.,” said Tarance Drafts, acting CBP port director for the Area Port of Philadelphia. “CBP derives no great pleasure from seizing travelers’ currency. However, there are severe consequences for failing to comply with our nation’s laws.”

CBP’s Port of Philadelphia seized $1,319,195 in unreported currency during Fiscal Year 2013, (Oct. 1, 2012 – Sept. 30, 2013).

In both cases, CBP officers were conducting routine enforcement operations on outbound international flights.

CBP routinely conducts such inspections on arriving and departing international passengers and cargo, and searches for terrorist weapons, dangerous drugs, unreported currency, counterfeit merchandise, prohibited agriculture, and other illicit products.

If these women weren’t up to anything illegal, then having their money seized by customs was totally avoidable. They would have had to file the currency report, and demonstrate a lawful source for the money and lawful intended use. In cases of a civil customs money seizure as here, a person can file a petition for remission for the return of the currency. If you have had currency seized from Customs, do not go it alone. Get the advice of an attorney who knows what he is doing. If you do not, you might only make the situation worse by handling it on your own or hiring a lawyer who doesn’t regularly handle these cases.

If you have had moneyseized by customs and are contemplating what to do next, please make use of the other information available on this website or call our office at (734) 855-4999 to speak to a customs lawyer, or e-mail us through our contact page. We are able to assist with cash seized by customs around the country, including Chicago, Atlanta, New York, Los Angeles, Orlando and many other places, and not just locally in Detroit.

Please read these other articles:

  1. Seizure of currency and monetary instruments by U.S. Customs
  2. Seizure for bulk cash smuggling into or out of the U.S.
  3. Structuring currency imports and exports
  4. Is it $10,000 per person?  Under what circumstances is filing a report with Customs for transporting more than $10,000 required?
  5. Criminal & civil penalties for failing to report monetary instrument transportation
  6. Is only cash currency subject to seizure by Customs?
  7. Responding to a Customs currency seizure
  8. How do I get my seized money back?
  9. Getting money seized by U.S. Customs back while staying overseas
  10. How long does it take Customs to decide a petition for a currency/monetary instrument seizure?

Customs Seizes $409,000 in Unreported Currency

Customs in Arizona seized a particularly large amount of unreported currency for what appears to be bulk cash smuggling offenses (that is, concealing cash so as to evade the reporting requirement) and failing to file a currency and monetary instrument report (CMIR) for amounts being transported over $10,000. Presumptively, since the individuals involved in the transportation of the money seized by Customs were involved, there is probable cause that these events were linked to some sort of illegal activity.

Every time currency is seized Customs asks the district attorney’s office if they want to prosecute. In this instance, the government is likely going to decide prosecute and the people are would face criminal charges. If it turns out the money was from legitimate source and she had a legitimate intended use, this situation was completely avoidable. But now, even if criminal charges are ultimately not filed or if they are ultimately not found guilty of a crime, they will still face civil forfeiture of the money and, if they wants it back, will have to fight for its return administratively, or in the courts.

(Tuesday, January 07, 2014) Tucson, Ariz. — Two women, a 36-year-old Mexican national and a 29-year-old U.S. citizen, were arrested Sunday in separate incidents for attempting to smuggle unreported U.S. currency into Mexico through ports in southern Arizona.

U.S. Customs and Border Protection Officers conducting outbound inspections at the Port of Nogales selected a vehicle driven by a Nogales, Sonora, Mexico woman for further inspection and found $301,000 in unreported cash hidden in a wheel-well of her vehicle. The cash was seized.

Earlier in the day at the Port of Douglas, officers referred a Ford SUV for further inspection where they found $108,000 in unreported U.S. currency concealed in the center console.The vehicle and cash were processed for seizure.

Both women were arrested and referred to U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement’s Homeland Security Investigations.

Individuals arrested may be charged by complaint, the method by which a person is charged with criminal activity, which raises no inference of guilt. An individual is presumed innocent unless and until competent evidence is presented to a jury that establishes guilt beyond a reasonable doubt.

If you have had cash seized by customs and are contemplating what to do next, please make use of the other information available on this website or call our office at (734) 855-4999 to speak to a customs lawyer, or e-mail us through our contact page. We are able to assist with cash seized by customs around the country, including Chicago, Atlanta, New York, Los Angeles, Orlando and many other places, and not just locally in Detroit.

Please read these other articles:

  1. Seizure of currency and monetary instruments by U.S. Customs
  2. Seizure for bulk cash smuggling into or out of the U.S.
  3. Structuring currency imports and exports
  4. Is it $10,000 per person?  Under what circumstances is filing a report with Customs for transporting more than $10,000 required?
  5. Criminal & civil penalties for failing to report monetary instrument transportation
  6. Is only cash currency subject to seizure by Customs?
  7. Responding to a Customs currency seizure
  8. How do I get my seized money back?
  9. Getting money seized by U.S. Customs back while staying overseas
  10. How long does it take Customs to decide a petition for a currency/monetary instrument seizure?

CBP Seizes $82,000 in Currency

In a news release issued today from Customs we learn about a recent customs money seizure in Brownsville, Texas, that involves concealing the currency inside a vehicle. Because the news release does not contain the individual’s name involved in the bulk cash smuggling and failure to report offense, it seems likely that she was not ultimately arrested. This seems to be confirmed by the fact that the news release explains that, in order to get the seized money back from customs, you may file a petition and prove legitimate source and a legitinate intended use. See our selection of articles by our customs lawyer below the following excerpt for more on the process of getting your seized money back from customs.

U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) officers conducting outbound enforcement operations at the Brownsville Port of Entry seized $81,864 in bulk U.S. currency.

“Vigilance in our outbound enforcement inspections is critical to our efforts of keeping undeclared currency from being exported without meeting proper reporting requirements. I commend our CBP officers for an outstanding seizure and arrest in this alleged bulk currency smuggling case,” said Michael Freeman, CBP Port Director, Brownsville.

On December 7, 2013, CBP officers working outbound enforcement operations at the Brownsville and Matamoros International Bridge came in contact with a 2002 Chrysler Town & Country as it attempted to exit the United States and enter Mexico. The female driver, a 42 year-old United States citizen from Brownsville, Texas was referred to secondary for further inspection. In secondary, a search of the Chrysler resulted in the discovery of three packages of bulk U.S. currency hidden within the vehicle.

CBP officers seized the currency; the driver has been transferred into the custody of U.S. Homeland Security Investigations (HSI) special agents for further investigation.

It is not a crime to carry more than $10,000, but it is a federal offense not to declare currency or monetary instruments totaling $10,000 or more [Editor’s Note: Actually, the law says more than $10,000] to a CBP officer upon entry or exit from the U.S. or to conceal it with intent to evade reporting requirements. Failure to declare may result in seizure of the currency and/or arrest. An individual may petition for the return of currency seized by CBP officers, but the petitioner must prove that the source and intended use of the currency was legitimate.

If you have had cash seized by customs and are contemplating what to do next, please make use of the other information available on this website or call our office at (734) 855-4999 to speak to a customs lawyer, or e-mail us through our contact page. We are able to assist with cash seized by customs around the country, including Chicago, Atlanta, New York, Los Angeles, Orlando and many other places, and not just locally in Detroit.

Please read these other articles:

  1. Seizure of currency and monetary instruments by U.S. Customs
  2. Seizure for bulk cash smuggling into or out of the U.S.
  3. Structuring currency imports and exports
  4. Is it $10,000 per person?  Under what circumstances is filing a report with Customs for transporting more than $10,000 required?
  5. Criminal & civil penalties for failing to report monetary instrument transportation
  6. Is only cash currency subject to seizure by Customs?
  7. Responding to a Customs currency seizure
  8. How do I get my seized money back?
  9. Getting money seized by U.S. Customs back while staying overseas
  10. How long does it take Customs to decide a petition for a currency/monetary instrument seizure?

Customs Currency Seizure Totalling $421,770

In a recent news release U.S. Customs (CBP) seized nearly half of a million dollars in money concealed in the quarter panels of a vehicle. This means that the vehicle is subject to seizure as not only a vehicle outfitted for smuggling but also because it is a conveyance used in the violation of a law. That story is below:

El Paso, Texas – U.S. Customs and Border Protection officers and U.S. Border Patrol agents performing southbound inspections at the El Paso port of entry seized $421,770 November 9. The money was concealed in the quarter panels of a car and in the purse of the driver.

“The team of CBP officers and Border Patrol agents performing outbound examinations are working hard to stop the flow of smuggled currency, weapons, ammunition, and other violations,” said El Paso Port Director Hector Mancha. “Individuals can export any amount of money they desire but if the total exceeds $10,000 it must be reported to CBP. Failure to properly report incoming and outgoing monetary instruments can result in seizure of the proceeds.

The seizure occurred at approximately 7 p.m. November 9 at the Ysleta international crossing. CBP officers and Border Patrol agents were screening southbound traffic when they selected a 2004 Chevrolet Cavalier for a secondary exam. As CBP personnel were interviewing the driver and lone occupant of the car a CBP currency detector dog alerted to the quarter panels of the vehicle. CBP personnel continued their exam and located bundles of money hidden within the quarter panels. CBP recovered a total of 36 packages of bundled currency including four in the purse of the driver. No arrests were made and the investigation continues at this time.

The fact that no arrestswere made and the investigation continues seems to indicate to me that, perhaps, there was no nexus to illegal activity. Maybe they were hiding the money to keep it safe. I have handled stranger cases. If the money is civilly seized the persons with an interest in it are going to eventually get a notice of seizure to which they will have to respond.

If you have had cash seized by customs and are contemplating what to do next, please make use of the other information available on this website or call our office at (734) 855-4999 to speak to a customs lawyer, or e-mail us through our contact page. We are able to assist with cash seized by customs around the country, including Chicago, Atlanta, New York, Los Angeles, Orlando and many other places, and not just locally in Detroit.

Please read these other articles:

  1. Seizure of currency and monetary instruments by U.S. Customs
  2. Seizure for bulk cash smuggling into or out of the U.S.
  3. Structuring currency imports and exports
  4. Is it $10,000 per person?  Under what circumstances is filing a report with Customs for transporting more than $10,000 required?
  5. Criminal & civil penalties for failing to report monetary instrument transportation
  6. Is only cash currency subject to seizure by Customs?
  7. Responding to a Customs currency seizure
  8. How do I get my seized money back?
  9. Getting money seized by U.S. Customs back while staying overseas
  10. How long does it take Customs to decide a petition for a currency/monetary instrument seizure?

Customs Seizes $35,018 in Currency

Customs has released another customs money seizure news release about some unreported and concealed money that was being taken from the U.S. to Mexico. Because the money was 1) not reported and 2) concealed, it can be seized for both failing to file a report and for concealing money with the intention to evade the reporting requirement. What the release particularly notes and what I want to draw attention to is that the vehicle was seized — a “conveyance” (here, the vehicle) can be seized because it was involved in a smuggling attempt, because it was outfitted for the purposes of smuggling, and/or because it was used to aid an importation contrary to law.

U.S. Customs and Border Protection officers working at the Calexico downtown port of entry Thursday . . . and intercepted $35,018 in unreported U.S. currency . . . . The . . . incident occurred shortly after 6 p.m. on Nov. 14, when CBP officers were conducting southbound inspections of travelers heading to Mexico through the Calexico downtown port of entry. Officers targeted a 2006 Chevrolet Silverado pickup truck and referred the driver, a 30-year-old male, and vehicle for a more in-depth examination. During an intensive inspection that included an alert from a currency and firearms detector dog and use of the port’s imaging system, officers discovered two wrapped packages of U.S. currency concealed inside the center console between the vehicle’s front seats.

The report goes on to to state the the vehicle and currency were seized, and to note that it is a federal offense not to declare currency or monetary instruments totaling more than $10,000 to a CBP officer upon entry or exit from the U.S. or to conceal it with intent to evade reporting requirements.

If you have had cash seized by customs and are contemplating what to do next, please make use of the other information available on this website or call our office at (734) 855-4999 to speak to a customs lawyer, or e-mail us through our contact page. We are able to assist with cash seized by customs around the country, including Chicago, Atlanta, New York, Los Angeles, Orlando and many other places, and not just locally in Detroit.

Please read these other articles:

  1. Seizure of currency and monetary instruments by U.S. Customs
  2. Seizure for bulk cash smuggling into or out of the U.S.
  3. Structuring currency imports and exports
  4. Is it $10,000 per person?  Under what circumstances is filing a report with Customs for transporting more than $10,000 required?
  5. Criminal & civil penalties for failing to report monetary instrument transportation
  6. Is only cash currency subject to seizure by Customs?
  7. Responding to a Customs currency seizure
  8. How do I get my seized money back?
  9. Getting money seized by U.S. Customs back while staying overseas
  10. How long does it take Customs to decide a petition for a currency/monetary instrument seizure?

Customs Money Seizure Radio Interview

Customs lawyer Jason Wapiennik will be interviewed today at 4:30 EST on Detroit’s AM 680/690 by certified Arabic interpreter Ratib Habbal in a live interview that will be translated from English into Arabic. We will be discussing common questions with regards to customs money seizures, getting seized money back from Customs, and other areas of Great Lakes Customs Law’s many practice areas.

The interview can be heard live by visiting the WNZK‘s live audio stream HERE.

CBP Counterfeit Handbag Seizure

I am sharing this news releases from Customs & Border Protection because it has to deal with topics that we have discussed in previous articles, namely seizures by CBP for counterfeit importations. We previously discussed the notion of gray market goods and touched on the topic of counterfeit imports in our article called Trademark Infringement: Importing Gray Market Goods and Seizure by Customs. This article only says that the bags were “in violation of the Hermes protected trademark” but does not specifically say how they were in violation; because the news release goes on to say that these bags were concealed within a shipment of non-infringing merchandise it seems unlikely that this was an innocent mistake by an inexperienced importer. It shows an intent to commit a fraud.

Los Angeles — U.S. Customs & Border Protection (CBP) officers and import specialists at the Los Angeles/Long Beach Seaport complex seized 16,053 counterfeit Hermes handbags in nine shipments from June 6 through September 17. All were in violation of the Hermes protected trademark.

Their combined domestic value of $295,665 contrasted to the manufacturer suggested retail price of $210,785,475 had they been genuine, illustrates the potentially high profit margins in such an illegal venture.

“CBP officers are trained to identify and interdict counterfeit goods, and this is a great example of how their training and expertise are employed every day in our ports of entry,” said CBP Director of Field Operations in Los Angeles Todd C. Owen. “These counterfeiters are not only cheating the legitimate designers and manufacturers of protected trademark merchandise, but also the public and the U.S. government,” he added.

Eight of the shipments were coming from China, one from China via Hong Kong. Two had the knock-offs hidden in the nose of the containers with concealing attempts of packing legitimate, non-infringing merchandise behind them.

Five different importers sent the shipments. All were destined to surrounding areas of Los Angeles except for one destined to Texas.

CBP Counterfeit Handbag Seizure
Approximately $1.26 billion worth of counterfeit goods originating overseas were seized by CBP in 2012. China, Hong Kong, Singapore, India and Taiwan are the top five countries of origination for counterfeit goods seized by CBP.

Nationwide, handbags and wallets comprised the greatest number of counterfeit items seized by CBP last year, with the value of seizures up 142 percent compared to 2011. Of the approximately $511 million in handbags and wallets seized, more than $446 million came from China.

Violations of trade laws, including violations of intellectual property rights laws can be reported to CBP online. ( e-Allegations Submission )

It looks like someone is going to be getting a notice of penalty CBP’s Fines, Penalties and Forfeiture’s office very soon. If you are facing penalties from CBP for items you have imported or for your import practices, call my office at (734) 855-4999 or e-mail us through our contact page.

$296,010 Customs Currency Seizure

From the CBP news releases:

U.S. Customs and Border Protection officers working at the Imperial Valley ports of entry over the weekend intercepted [ . . . ] $296,010 in undeclared currency . . . .

[ . . . ]

[On September 6, 2013], at about 5:00 p.m., CBP officers were conducting southbound inspections of travelers heading to Mexico through the Andrade port of entry. Officers targeted a 2001 Chrysler Town and Country minivan and referred the 56-year-old driver and his passenger, a 54-year-old female, both Mexican citizens, for further examination.

Inside the vehicle, CBP officers discovered a large box among several other household items. The box was emptied during the inspection, revealing bundles of undeclared currency totaling $296,010.

[ . . . ]

“CBP officers at the Imperial Valley ports of entry have proven to be exceptionally skilled at discovering unconventional concealment methods and these seizures are illustrative of those skills,” said Pete Flores, Director of Operations for the San Diego Field Office.

All subjects were turned over to the custody of Homeland Security Investigation (HSI) agents for further processing and were transported to the Imperial County Jail to await arraignment.

It is a federal offense not to declare currency or monetary instruments totaling more than $10,000 to a CBP officer upon entry or exit from the U.S. or to conceal it with intent to evade reporting requirements. Failure to declare may result in seizure of the currency and/or arrest.

If you have money seized and receive a notice of seizure, do not decide how to respond to a CAFRA Notice without first consulting an attorney. Any mistake or error in judgment you make can cost you dearly.The Petition process is a legal process. The petition itself is and should always be a legal document, no different than in any other legal proceeding, that contains detailed factual narrative, what led to the seizure, a review of the relevant law, regulations and Custom’s own guidelines concerning the criteria for remission. When the facts allow for it, our Petition will always include a strong argument for return of the money in full, or even when there is a valid basis for the currency seizure, a strong argument for the money to be returned upon payment of a fine in the smallest amount of money possible, rather than forfeiture of all your money.

If you have had currency seized and are contemplating what to do next, please make use of the other information I make available on this website or call my office at (734) 855-4999 or e-mail us through ourcontact page. We are able to assist with currency seizures around the country.

Arizona CBP Officers Seize $300,000 in Cash

From U.S. Customs & Border Protection:

A 35-year-old Douglas, Ariz. man was arrested Friday for attempting to smuggle $300,000 in unreported U.S. currency into Mexico through the Port of Douglas.

Customs and Border Protection officers conducting outbound inspections selected a Toyota truck, driven by Jerry Joseph Del Rio, for further inspection. When officers searched the vehicle they located seven packages of U.S. currency hidden inside of a compartment in the truck cab. The truck and cash were processed for seizure.

Del Rio was turned over to U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement’s Homeland Security Investigations.

Individuals arrested may be charged by complaint, the method by which a person is charged with criminal activity, which raises no inference of guilt. An individual is presumed innocent unless and until competent evidence is presented to a jury that establishes guilt beyond a reasonable doubt.

CBP’s Office of Field Operations is the primary organization within Homeland Security tasked with an anti-terrorism mission at our nation’s ports. CBP officers screen all people, vehicles and goods entering the United States while facilitating the flow of legitimate trade and travel. Their mission also includes carrying out border-related duties, including narcotics interdiction, enforcing immigration and trade laws, and protecting the nation’s food supply and agriculture industry from pests and diseases.

If you have had currency seized and are contemplating what to do next, please make use of the other information I make available on this website or call my office at (734) 855-4999 or e-mail us through our contact page. We are able to assist with currency seizures around the country, including Chicago, Atlanta, New York, Los Angeles, Orlando and many other places, and not just locally in Detroit.

Please read these other articles:

  1. Seizure of currency and monetary instruments by U.S. Customs
  2. Seizure for bulk cash smuggling into or out of the U.S.
  3. Structuring currency imports and exports
  4. Is it $10,000 per person?  Under what circumstances is filing a report with Customs for transporting more than $10,000 required?
  5. Criminal & civil penalties for failing to report monetary instrument transportation
  6. Is only cash currency subject to seizure by Customs?
  7. Responding to a Customs currency seizure
  8. How do I get my seized money back?