Tag: logan airport

An image of a traveler's with $10,000 sewn into his pants which was seized by uscbU.S. Customs & Border Protection

Boston CBP Seizes Cash Sewn into Pants

CBP officers at Boston’s Logan airport seized nearly $30,000 from a man who was returning from Israel. The story, detailed below, reveals that the money reported traveling with $14,000; CBP inspected his bags, discovered another $4,000 which led to a more intensive search. It was at this point that they discovered $10,000 sewn into the lining of his pants. CBP seized the cash.

The bulk cash smuggling law states:

Whoever, with the intent to evade a currency reporting requirement under section 5316, knowingly conceals more than $10,000 in currency or other monetary instruments on the person of such individual . . . shall be guilty of a currency smuggling offense . . . . the concealment of currency on the person of any individual includes concealment in any article of clothing worn by the individual . . .

Sewing it $10,000 into your pants is classic, along with not reporting the full amount you are carrying in other places, is classic bulk cash smuggling. Here’s the full story from CBP

BOSTON – On January 18, U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) officers at Logan International Airport intercepted an inbound traveler found with a stack of concealed currency sewn into the lining of his pants.

The subject, a 51-year-old male, U.S. citizen arriving on a flight from Israel, reported to officers that he was carrying $7,000 and an extra $7,000 for a family friend. During a baggage examination, the subject presented approximately $18,000 however, further inspection revealed an additional $10,000 sewn into the pockets of his pants. In total, CBP officers discovered and seized more than $29,000.

Travelers may carry as much currency as they wish into and out of the United States. Federal law requires that travelers must report all U.S. and foreign monetary instruments totaling $10,000 or greater on a U.S. Treasury Department financial form. None of the currency is taxed.

“There is no limit to how much money a traveler can carry, but it is important to honestly declare the total amount to CBP officers during inspection,” said Boston Area Port Director Clint Lamm. “This seizure exemplifies that violating currency reporting laws can have serious consequences.”

According to NECN, “During a baggage examination, officers found another $4,000 in his luggage. An additional $10,000 was found sewn into the pockets of his pants, a discovery the department is referring to as ‘hot pockets.'”

Have you had cash seized at Boston Logan airport?

If you’ve had cash seized at Boston Logan airport, you can learn more from our trusted legal guide to a customs money seizure and can contact us for a free currency seizure consultation by clicking the contact buttons on this page.
An April 22 notice of seizure and intent to forfeit cash seized at Boston Logan airport.

$14k Cash Seized at Boston Logan Airport

Back in September of 2015, $14,080 in cash was seized at Boston Logan Airport (BOS – port code 0417) by U.S. Customs & Border Protection. Seven months later, the seized cash is still languishing in the bank accounts of Customs because the interested people apparently failed to convince customs the money came from a legitimate source or had a legitimate intended use. That is why it is Boston CBP published a notice of seizure and intent to forfeit, to start and finalize the administrative forfeiture process (which does not involve a judge, unless a claim is filed requesting judicial forfeiture).
We have a great history of success in getting seized cash back from Customs and have successfully represented clients with a cash seizure at Boston Logan Airport. Don’t be foolish and try to get money back yourself, or hire an inexperienced lawyer to do it for you — you will get a bad result. A petition must not be an apology letter! This is why we recommend hiring a customs lawyer to get seized cash back from Customs.
PUBLICATION/POSTING START: April 22, 2016
PUBLICATION/POSTING END: May 21, 2016
DEADLINE TO FILE A CLAIM: June 21, 201

BOSTON, MA
2015041700014401-001-0000, Seized on 09/25/2015; At the port of LOGAN AIRPORT, CT; U.S. CURRENCY; 153;EA; Valued at $14,080.00; For violation of 31USC5316

Have you had cash seized at Boston Logan airport?

If you’ve had cash seized at Boston Logan airport, you can learn more from our trusted legal guide to a customs money seizure and can contact us for a free currency seizure consultation by clicking the contact buttons on this page. As we try to make clear on the free currency seizure materials on our website, the process is very complicated and CBP can be extremely adversarial and stubborn in their refusal to return your money to you after a seizure. There is reason for great caution whenever you are communicating with Customs after a seizure.