Tag: failure to report

Dulles CBP Seizes $227K from 4 Travelers

The DC Metro area has a large community of African ex-pats, which means that the DC Metro area and specifically, Dulles airport, has a lot of cash moving into and out of the country from and to Africa.

The story quoted below from CBP pertains to 4 recent cash seizures, 3 of which involve Africa. First, more than $100,000 from a couple traveling to Lagos, Nigeria. Customs seized all the cash after the couple only reported less than $20,000. From the looks of it (the money was in differing envelopes), they were probably carrying cash back for others.

Second, someone traveling to Ethiopia had $13,000+ seized by CBP after reporting only $2,700 at the Dulles airport.
Third, a man traveling to Ghana with $82,560 had all of his money seized by airport CBP, with no further details provided.
Finally, a father and daughter couple had about $30,000 seized by CBP on their way to Doha, Qatar.
As I’ve said as I’ve said in my commentary on previous seizures from CBP in Dulles Airport, it is one of the more stringent and more difficult places to get seized money back from. The the evidence that needs to be supplied to satisfy them that the seized currency came from a legitimate source and legitimate intended use must be thorough and meticulously presented.
Here’s the story:

STERLING, Va. – U.S. Customs and Border Protection officers seized more than $227,000 from travelers departing Washington Dulles International Airport to Africa during the last 30 days for violating U.S. currency reporting laws.

The most recent seizure was the largest as CBP officers seized $101,825 from a U.S. citizen couple destined to Lagos, Nigeria on Saturday. The couple verbally declared $19,600 and completed a U.S. Treasury Department FINCEN 105 form reporting that amount. A subsequent baggage search revealed additional envelopes of currency. Officers seized all the currency and released the travelers.

Also on Saturday, CBP officers seized $13,332 in unreported currency from a U.S. lawful permanent resident who was destined to Addis Ababa, Ethiopia. The resident, a Togo national, reported that he possessed $2,700. Officers discovered the additional currency during a baggage examination.

On October 1, CBP officers seized $82,560 in unreported currency from a U.S. traveler who attempted to board a flight to Accra, Ghana, and on September 17, CBP officers seized $29,822 in unreported currency from a U.S. father and daughter who were boarding a flight to Doha, Qatar. A CBP currency detector dog alerted to the bulk currency in these two seizures.

The total amount of unreported currency seized was $227,539.

CBP is not releasing any of the travelers’ names because none were criminally charged.

Has Dulles CBP seized your cash?

If Dulles CBP has seized your cash, we urge you to call us for a consultation before considering doing it yourself. You probably will not be happy with the outcome if you do, based on Dulles’ aggressive posture in most cases. Read our trusted customs money seizure legal guide (or watch the videos) and can contact us for a free currency seizure consultation by clicking the contact buttons on this page.

Display of cash seized by Dulles CBP going to Ethiopia

Dulles CBP Seizes $27K in Cash from Ethiopia-bound Family

CBP made a press release about a recent cash seizure which, to my mind, makes them look pretty bad because I often hear the emotional side of customs money seizure cases from the violators (who yeah, are also victims).

It is sad because it’s a family of 5 traveling to Ethiopia. Although they had $27,330 with them, the government seized all but $830. Imagine getting around in a cash-based economy on $830.

Also imagine having to pay re-booking fees, hotel and transportation costs for 5 people. 😢💸

The details are below, but basically, the father reported having $8,000. Then the son reported he had $8,000 (structuring, anyone?). Then CBP found another $11,000 in their bags.

Tragic, yes. Avoidable, very much yes. CBP wants you to know – report the money truthfully, and you can avoid such tragedies! Unfortunately now, the family is going to have much more work to do than just filling out a FinCen 105 form when they try to get their money back from CBP Dulles. A lot more work, and a lot more time.

Do it the easy way. Report your cash before you get asked!

STERLING, Va. – With airline staffing shortages forcing flight cancellations and route reductions, it seems now would be an ideal time for international travelers to truthfully report all of their currency to Customs and Border Protection officers during an outbound inspection.

One Ethiopia-bound family learned that lesson the hard way after CBP officers seized $27,330 from them on Sunday at Washington Dulles International Airport for violating U.S. currency reporting requirements. The family also missed their once daily flight to Ethiopia and lost a day of their vacation trip.

Officers approached the family of five at the departure gate and asked how much currency they possessed. The father, a naturalized U.S. citizen from Ethiopia, verbally reported that he had about $8,000. Officers then reminded the travelers of federal currency reporting laws and asked the father to annotate the back of the CBP form describing the currency reporting law. As the father prepared to write their currency amount and sign, the eldest son reported that he also possessed about $8,000.

The father then completed a U.S. Treasury form for the total amount of currency. During a subsequent inspection of their carry-on bags, CBP officers discovered an additional $11,000.

CBP officers then escorted the family back to CBP’s inspection station and examined their checked baggage. Officers found no additional currency. Officers discovered and seized a total of $27,330 for violating U.S. currency reporting laws. Officers returned $830 to the family and released them to continue their trip. However, their flight had already departed and they had to be rebooked on another Ethiopian Airlines flight.

Has Dulles CBP seized your cash?

If Dulles CBP has seized your cash, we urge you to call us for a consultation before considering doing it yourself. You probably will not be happy with the outcome if you do, based on Dulles’ aggressive posture in most cases. Read our trusted customs money seizure legal guide (or watch the videos) and can contact us for a free currency seizure consultation by clicking the contact buttons on this page.

Hundred Dollar Bills Stacked of Cash Seized by CBP Texas

CBP Officers Seize over $100K in Undeclared Currency at Hidalgo International Bridge

Earlier this year, CBP seized a shocking amount of money was seized heading into Mexico from the United States by a 26 year old female U.S. citizen. The money was all found “on her person,” which is a way of saying that the money was more than just “undeclared” but rather, was smuggled. The cash was seized and the woman was arrested. Here’s the relevant part of the story (original here):

HIDALGO, Texas—U.S. Customs and Border Protection, Office of Field Operations (OFO) at the Hidalgo International Bridge intercepted $114,294 in undeclared currency.

On April 24, 2022, CBP officers conducting outbound enforcement operations at the Hidalgo International Bridge encountered a blue Ford SUV making its way out of the United States toward Mexico. The vehicle was a taxi occupied by a 26-year-old U.S. citizen woman. The vehicle was selected for inspection and at the secondary inspection area, officers discovered numerous packages of tape wrapped U.S. currency on the woman’s person. A total of twelve packages with a total of $114,294 of undeclared currency was discovered on her person.

The currency was seized by CBP. The subject was arrested, and the case was turned over to U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement-Homeland Security Investigations (ICE-HSI) special agents for further investigation.

The fact the woman was arrested is a pretty good indication that CBP believed the money was connected to illegal activity beyond the simple failure to report and smuggling; that it was derived from or intended to further some illegal enterprise, such as narcotic trafficking.

Have you had cash seized by CBP?

If you’ve had cash seized CBP in Hidalgo, you can learn more about the process from our trusted customs money seizure legal guide and can contact us for a free currency seizure consultation by clicking the contact buttons on this page.

YouTube Logo

Electronic FinCen105 From CBP

In the past few years, CBP has made it possible to file a FinCEN 105 form online at this website. Common sense would tell you if you file the report that you’re carrying more than $10,000 in cash (or monetary instruments) online, you can avoid having to go through the hassle of reporting the money in person.

That’s common sense, anyway. So much for that, because you’d be 100% wrong. If you file the report online, you still have to physically report to CBP as confirmation! For this reason, I did a new YouTube video on the topic:

You can also see my other YouTube videos on related cash seizure topics on our channel here: Great Lakes Customs Law YouTube Channel

Has CBP seized your money?

Has CBP seized your money? If so, we can help. Read our helpful customs money seizure legal guide (or watch the videos) and contact us for a free currency seizure consultation by clicking the contact buttons on this page.

 

Chart of Detroit Field Office FY21 Enforcement Stats

CBP Detroit Seizes $5.6 Million in 2021

Cash seizures by Detroit CBP are picking up steam, as travel increased over the summer months as the pandemic (appeared) to diminish. You’ll recall in June, we reported on the 60% decline in cash seizures in Detroit; now, CBP is reporting (among other interesting statistics) that cash seizures have increased by 30% from FY20 to a total of $5.6 million. This is still far shy of the $7.8 million seized in FY 2019 (the record, as far as I can tell, was $10 million in FY 2015!).

Here’s the interesting parts from the full story:

The Detroit Field Office includes the Ambassador Bridge and Detroit Windsor Tunnel, the Blue Water Bridge in Port Huron, the International Bridge in Sault Ste. Marie, and Detroit Metropolitan Airport.

    • Firearms/Ammunition ~

A total of 181 firearms were seized – along with 40,000 rounds of ammunition which is a 650% increase from Fiscal Year 2021 .

Undeclared Currency ~

The amount of undeclared currency seized rose 30% from FY20 to a total of $5.6 million.

Arrests ~

A total of 181 individuals were arrested in Fiscal Year 2021 for reasons to include: narcotics smuggling, human smuggling, firearms violations, and fraud.

Trade Stats ~

In Fiscal Year 2021 the Detroit Field Office enhanced the nation’s economic prosperity by processing 2,300,000 commercial trucks which was a 9% increase from 2020. Detroit continues to be the second busiest truck crossing in the entire United States and continues to process approximately 20% of all commercial trucks entering the United States annually. The Detroit Field Office also continued to strengthen its ties with the trade community and international supply chains in 2021 which resulted in a 12% increase of international trade entering the United States via ports of entry in Michigan worth $138 billion.

Agriculture Stats/Seizure – Securing American Agriculture

In Fiscal Year 2021, Detroit Field Office CBP agriculture specialists helped protect America’s agriculture, natural resources, and economic prosperity, intercepting 1,253 pests from entering the United States

Has Detroit CBP seized your cash?

If CBP in Detroit seized your cash, you need a lawyer. Read our trusted customs money seizure legal guide and can contact us for a free currency seizure consultation by clicking the contact buttons on this page.

Dulles CBP Seized $46K in Money from Airport Traveler

CBP at Dulles airport seized $46,000 from a man traveling to Cameroon. He reported having $30,000, but CBP found $16,628 more tucked away inside his carry-on bag (ahem, bulk cash smuggling). The full story is here, with my comments on the excerpt below:

U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) officers seized $46,628 in unreported currency (ahem, failure to report) from a man traveling to Cameroon at Washington Dulles International Airport on Monday.

CBP officers conducted random outbound inspections of passengers boarding a flight to Brussels, Belgium and asked a U.S. citizen how much currency he possessed. The man reported verbally that he had $30,000 and completed a U.S. Treasury Department form (FINCEN 105). During a subsequent examination of the man’s carry-on bags, CBP officers discovered a total of $46,628 in U.S. dollars.

U.S. Customs and Border Protection officers at Washington Dulles International Airport seized $46,628 in unreported currency from a U.S. citizen traveling to Cameroon on September 27, 2021.

. . .

CBP seized the currency and returned $628 to the man as humanitarian relief and released the man to continue his travel. CBP is not releasing the traveler’s name because he was not criminally charged.

Bad things can happen to you if you do not report your currency, read all about that at Long Term Consequences of Cash Seizure (or if you prefer to watch me talk about it, go to my YouTube video on the topic)

Has Dulles CBP seized your cash?

If Dulles CBP has seized your cash, we urge you to call us for a consultation before considering doing it yourself. You probably will not be happy with the outcome if you do, based on Dulles’ aggressive posture in most cases. Read our trusted customs money seizure legal guide (or watch the videos) and can contact us for a free currency seizure consultation by clicking the contact buttons on this page.

Detroit Field Offices 2020 Statistics

CBP Detroit Cash Seizures Decline by Nearly 60% in Pandemic

In fiscal year 2019 (October 2018 through October 2019), CBP seized $7.8 million in cash from (most unsuspecting) travelers at Detroit Metro Airport, the Ambassador Bridge, Detroit-Windsor Tunnel, and the Blue Water Bridge in Port Huron.

Last fiscal year (October 2019 through October 2020), however, CBP seized nearly 60% less than 2019! CBP seized only $4.6 million in cash in 2020. A marked decrease, likely due to the travel restrictions for basically 7 months of the entirety of the fiscal year. Here’s the story:

DETROIT — U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) personnel operating at the multiple ports of entry throughout Michigan had an unprecedented year, with a 1,736 percent increase in seized marijuana and 227 percent increase in seized firearms amid public health concerns and restricted travel conditions related to the global Covid-19 pandemic.

The Detroit Field Office includes the Ambassador Bridge and Detroit Windsor Tunnel, the Blue Water Bridge in Port Huron, the International Bridge in Sault Ste. Marie, and Detroit Metropolitan Airport.

Drug enforcement operations at Michigan’s five ports of entry netted the following totals: 9,059 pounds of marijuana – a 1,726 percent increase when compared with last fiscal year; 211 pounds of cocaine, more than 1.5 pounds of methamphetamines; and a little more than 15 pounds of fentanyl.

A total of 203 firearms were seized – a 227 percent increase from last year – along with 5,334 rounds of ammunition.

The amount of undeclared currency seized totaled $4.6 million dollars.

A total of 225 individuals were arrested in Fiscal Year 2020 for reasons to include: narcotics smuggling, human smuggling, firearms violations, and fraud.

Finally, our Agriculture Specialists intercepted 2,010 pests. Their diligence and expertise is crucial in preventing foreign pests from causing harm to the agriculture industry.

“This past year the men and women of CBP worked through some of the most adverse conditions that we have ever asked them to work through especially here in Detroit,” said Christopher Perry, Director of Field Operations for CBP in Detroit. “I am simply amazed at how our officers steadfastly enforced the laws of the United States, while fostering our nation’s economic security through lawful international trade and travel during the greatest pandemic my generation has seen.”

We have noticed an uptick in seizure cases again as the pandemic wanes, and people get vaccinated and become more comfortable (and able) to travel. Fiscal year 2021, which began in October 2020 and ends on October 2021, will still be majorly affected by pandemic. Less travel means less cash seizures by CBP.

Has Detroit CBP seized your cash?

If CBP in Detroit seized your cash, you need a lawyer. Read our trusted customs money seizure legal guide and can contact us for a free currency seizure consultation by clicking the contact buttons on this page.

 

CBP Texas seizes $297K Cash at Del Rio

Recently, customs discovered a huge cache of cash when inspecting a vehicle heading into Mexico. The story, which comes to us out of Del Rio Texas, part of the Laredo sector, is detailed below.

The headline of the news release styles this as being “unreported” currency, however what this really is (in addition to being unreported) is bulk cash smuggling. As that link explains, bulk cash smuggling occurs when money is hidden with the purpose of evading the reporting requirement that requires an individual entering or leaving the country with more than $10,000 to file a report.

 U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) Office of Field Operations (OFO) officers working outbound operations seized over $297,000 in undeclared currency in a single enforcement action.

“CBP conducts outbound enforcement operations to protect against unreported exportations of bulk U.S. currency, which often can be proceeds from alleged illicit activity, or currency that funds transnational criminal organizations,” said Port Director Liliana Flores, Del Rio Port of Entry. “This currency seizure demonstrates an outstanding job by our officers.”

The enforcement action occurred on Wednesday, May 5 at the Del Rio International Bridge, when officers assigned to outbound operations selected a 2011 Chevrolet Cruze traveling to Mexico for a secondary examination. Upon physical inspection of the vehicle, packages containing $297,311 in unreported U.S. currency were discovered.

The currency was seized by CBP OFO officers. A 23-year-old male Mexican citizen passenger was arrested, and the case was turned over to U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement-Homeland Security Investigations (ICE-HSI) special agents for further investigation.

Individuals are permitted to carry any amount of currency or monetary instruments into or out of the U.S., however, if the quantity is more than $10,000, they will need to report it to CBP. “Money” means monetary instruments and includes U.S. or foreign coins currently in circulation, currency, travelers’ checks in any form, money orders, and negotiable instruments or investment securities in bearer form. Failure to declare may result in seizure of the currency and/or arrest.

Has Del Rio CBP seized your cash?

If Del Rio CBP has seized your cash, we urge you to call us for a consultation before considering doing it yourself. Read our trusted customs money seizure legal guide (or watch the videos) and can contact us for a free currency seizure consultation by clicking the contact buttons on this page.

$201,585 in Unreported Currency Seized by CBP at Roma stacked in piles

CBP Officers Seize $201,585 in Unreported Currency at the Roma Port of Entry

I’ll give all my readers some free advice: if you have an extra $200,000 lying around, spend it inside the country — don’t take it across the border.

Why?

In today’s presentation of a CBP news release involving the misadventures of smugglers attempting to move cash across the border, we learn about a $201,585 which was seized in November 2020 as it was heading out to Mexico. Here’s the full story:

ROMA, Texas —U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) officers at the Roma Port of Entry recently seized more than $200,000 in unreported currency concealed in a vehicle during an outbound examination.

“Our CBP officers are dedicated to stopping the movement of illegal contraband and unreported currency from coming in and out of ports of entry. Even in challenging times, it is clear that our officers are truly dedicated in carrying out their mission. Their hard work and expertise never goes unnoticed,” said Port Director Andres Guerra, Roma Port of Entry.

The seizure occurred on Wednesday, November 11, 2020 when CBP officers referred a 2013 Chevrolet 1500 for a secondary inspection.  With the utilization of a non-intrusive imaging system, CBP officers discovered $201,585 concealed within the vehicle.

CBP officers seized the currency. The case was turned over to U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement-Homeland Security Investigations (ICE-HSI) for further investigation.

It is not a crime to carry more than $10,000, but it is a federal offense not to declare currency or monetary instruments totaling $10,000 or more to a CBP officer upon entry or exit from the U.S. or to conceal it with intent to evade reporting requirements. Failure to declare may result in seizure of the currency and/or arrest. An individual may petition for the return of currency seized by CBP officers, but the petitioner must prove that the source and intended use of the currency was legitimate.

Has Texas CBP seized your cash?

If Texas CBP seized your cash, we urge you to call us for a consultation before considering doing it yourself. You probably will not be happy with the outcome if you do, based on their’ aggressive posture in most cases. Read our trusted customs money seizure legal guide (or watch the videos) and can contact us for a free currency seizure consultation by clicking the contact buttons on this page.

$44000 Seized by Dulles CBP on Display

Dulles CBP Seizes $44,000 from Ethiopia Traveler

CBP officers at Dulles Airport their Washington DC, which happens to be part of the wider Baltimore Field office, seized almost $44,000 from a permanent resident and citizen of Cameroon who was traveling to Ethiopia.

As often happens, he was prompted to complete a currency reporting form after indicating that he possessed money. But, he only reported $10,000. Upon obtaining the false report, customs officers inspected his possessions and discovered that he actually possessed $43,000.

Here is the full story as contained in the news release:

STERLING, Va. –U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) officers at Washington Dulles International Airport seized nearly $44,000 in unreported currency from an Ethiopia-bound traveler on Monday.

CBP officers inspected a traveler as he attempted to board his departing flight. The man, a Cameroon citizen and U.S. lawful permanent resident, reported that he possessed $10,000 and completed a financial reporting form. While examining the man’s carryon bag, CBP officers discovered $43,580. Officers seized $43,000 and returned $580 to the man as humanitarian relief. Officer released him to continue his travel.

Customs and Border Protection officers seized nearly $44,000 in unreported currency from an Ethiopia-bound traveler at Washington Dulles International Airport on October 5, 2020.

CBP is not releasing the man’s name since he was not criminally charged. An investigation continues.

My usual disclaimer about the difficulty of getting money back after a seizure at CBP Dulles applies. Anyone who has money seized at Dulles Airport can expect a long and arduous process which will include scrupulously documenting the source of the money, including the production of detailed financial records, explanations of particular deposits into one’s bank account, and of course, scrupulous documentation translated into English about the intended use of the money.

Has Dulles CBP seized your cash?

If Dulles CBP has seized your cash, we urge you to call us for a consultation before considering doing it yourself. You probably will not be happy with the outcome if you do, based on Dulles’ aggressive posture in most cases. Read our trusted customs money seizure legal guide (or watch the videos) and can contact us for a free currency seizure consultation by clicking the contact buttons on this page.