Tag: fy 2020

$21,000 in cash seized by CBP at Washington-Dulles seized for currency reporting violations

Traveler Fails to Report $21,000 Seized by CBP

Yesterday, CBP publicized a cash seizure from a female traveler who failed to report $21,000 in cash she was transporting before boarding her plane at Dulles airport.

The woman, bound for Pakistan via Turkey, verbally reported carrying $6,000. Thereafter, a customs officer searched her bags and discovered a total of $21,255.

This is a classic violation of 31 USC 5316, where a person fails to report cash being transported by them to CBP. A report of currency must be made on form FinCEN 105 and presented to CBP before departure. It is not enough to verbally report the money when asked.

CBP will also surely allege that this is also an instance of bulk cash smuggling, because she was provided with an opportunity to disclosure the full amount of money she carried, but only reported $6,000. They later had to find the full $21,255 in her bag.

Here’s the full story, from CBP:

STERLING, Va. – U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) officers seized $21,255 in unreported currency from a U.S. woman destined to Pakistan Friday at Washington Dulles International Airport.

While CBP officers conducted an outbound inspection of passengers on a Turkey-bound flight, officers encountered the woman and asked how much currency she possessed. She reported $6,000 and confirmed that she understood federal currency reporting requirements. Officers discovered several envelopes in her carry-on baggage with a total of $21,255 in U.S. currency. Officers released $255 to the woman for humanitarian purposes and seized $21,000 for violating federal currency reporting requirements.

It is legal to carry large sums of currency into or out of the United States. However, federal law requires that travelers who possess $10,000 or more in currency or other monetary instruments must report it all to a CBP officer at the airport, seaport, or land border crossing when entering or leaving the country. Read more about currency reporting requirements.

Consequences for violating U.S. currency reporting laws are severe; penalties may include seizure of most or all of the traveler’s currency, and potential criminal charges.

Have you had money seized by CBP?

If CBP has seized your cash, you need a lawyer. Read our trusted customs money seizure legal guide and can contact us for a free currency seizure consultation by clicking the contact buttons on this page.

Stacks of U.S. currency seized by CBP for not being reported in the amount of $142,000

Unreported Cash Seized by CBP in Nogales

CBP officers in Nogales, Arizona, made some big cash seizures this week. In the first case, $143,000 was seized and in the second case, only $20,000 was seized.

Here’s the story:

U.S. Customs and Border Protection, Office of Field Operations, officers arrested 2 Mexican nationals and a U.S. citizen for separate alleged attempts to smuggle nearly $163,000 in unreported currency …. through the Port of Nogales earlier this week.

Officers conducting outgoing operations at the Dennis DeConcini Crossing referred a 28-year-old Mexican national man for additional inspection of his Chevy SUV, as he attempted to enter Mexico through the port Monday afternoon. The search of the vehicle led to the discovery of several packages within the left quarter panel. The packages contained more than $142,000 in unreported U.S. currency.

Tuesday afternoon, officers conducting outbound operations at the Mariposa Crossing referred a 22-year-old Tucson woman for a further search of her Honda sedan, as she attempted to cross into Mexico through the port. Officers searched the subject, who had two bundles of unreported U.S. currency inside of her purse containing more than $20,000.

Officers seized the currency, … and vehicles, while the subjects were arrested and then turned over to U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement’s Homeland Security Investigations.

Note how the $143,000 was hidden in the quarter panel of the vehicle (i.e., a body panel); and then how the $20,000 seized from the 22 year old woman was just inside her purse.

In both cases, the failure to report the money, coupled with the fact it was not presented to CBP and was in plain view, will allow CBP to allege that the money was hidden with the intent it not be reported to CBP, which is considered bulk cash smuggling.

The story also states everyone was arrested, which is for me a little surprising in the case of the woman with $20,000. I have a lot of clients who do not report amounts cash at or above that level, and they do not get arrested or face criminal sanctions. That leads me to believe this money she seized had connections to illegal activity.

Have you had money seized by CBP?

If CBP has seized your cash, you need a lawyer. Read our trusted customs money seizure legal guide and can contact us for a free currency seizure consultation by clicking the contact buttons on this page.

Sixty-thousand dollars hidden in the firewall of a vehicle seized by U.S. Customs & Border Protection

CBP Arizona Seizes Currency Smuggled in Car

In a story today, CBP tells the tale of a seizure of nearly $70,000 of bulk cash which was smuggled in the firewall panel of a Mexican national bringing the money into the United States. The full story, which also includes the story about a meth seizure, is here, but follows below:

U.S. Customs and Border Protection, Office of Field Operations, officers arrested a Mexican national . . . fore alleged attempts to smuggle more than $69,000 through Arizona Ports of Entry.

Officers at the Port of Naco referred a 39-year-old Naco, Arizona, man for additional inspection of his Hyundai sedan, as he attempted to enter the U.S. through the port Wednesday morning. After a CBP narcotics detection canine alerted to a scent it is trained to detect, the search of the vehicle led to the discovery of six packages concealed in the firewall. The packages were determined to contain more than $69,000 of unreported currency.

Officers seized the … currency and vehicles, while [the subject was] arrested and then turned over to U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement’s Homeland Security.

The fact of the arrest indicates they clear thought the money was tied to illegal sources, even though every failure to report and bulk cash smuggling offense is a crime and makes someone subject to arrest — more on that here: Failure to Report Cash to Customs and Bulk Cash Smuggling Seizure.

Have you had money seized by CBP in Arizona?

If CBP in Arizona has seized your cash, you need a lawyer. Read our trusted customs money seizure legal guide and can contact us for a free currency seizure consultation by clicking the contact buttons on this page.

$3,700 in counterfeit cash seized by CBP from an Argentinian woman laid out on a metal table presented by a CBP officer

CBP Seizes Over $72K in Undeclared Currency in Florida

Today, a story came out of Orlando, Florida, about a pretty large cash seizure. The story — which is light on the details about where they were from or where they were going — is a classic case failure to report combined with a bulk cash smuggling offense.

It is a failure to report because they did not file the FinCen 105 upon entry or departure with the customs officer in charge of the airport. It is also a failure to report because when stopped, they made an inaccurate declaration as to the amount seized; the reported first $15,000, then $51,000, but were ultimately found with $72,000.

It will likely be seized because the money was not reported — and mis-reported — and also hidden from view, such as someone might hide it prevent to discovery by CBP. These two elements — failure to report and hiding — will allow CBP to presume that the money was hidden with the intent it not be reported to CBP, which is the essence of a bulk cash smuggling offense.

Here’s the story:

U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) in Florida reminds travelers of the requirement to report currency amounts of $10,000 or more to CBP when traveling to or from the United States. CBP officers seized over $72,000 in unreported currency from a traveler at Orlando International Airport (MCO) for failing to declare this week.

The individual initially said they possessed $15,000 to CBP officers and further misstated the amount as $51,000 in writing. CBP officers subsequently discovered bundles of cash inside a backpack.

International travelers who arrive or depart the United States in possession of more than $10,000 or equivalent foreign currency are required to report all currency to CBP officers and complete a Treasury Department Financial Crimes Enforcement Network (FinCEN) form.

Consequences for violating U.S. currency reporting laws are severe and may result in seizure of the currency and/or arrest.

Have you had money seized by CBP in Orlando?

If CBP in Orlando has seized your cash, you need a lawyer. Read our trusted customs money seizure legal guide and can contact us for a free currency seizure consultation by clicking the contact buttons on this page.