Tag: fincen 105

Stacks of cash seized by CBP in Laredo

CBP Laredo Seizes $261K in Currency to Mexico

In two recent cases described in a news release below two individuals were arrested not filing a CMIR (FinCen 105 report) upon leaving the USA to Mexico.

The story is light on details — except, for some reason, what car the people were driving (for unknown reasons this is always so important at the Mexican border!).

There is no mention of bulk cash smuggling, though it seems likely the money was hidden and not reported. Even if they are criminally charged, both defendants would have the ability to get the money back provided they show the money has no nexus to illegal activity (legitimate source, legitimate use).

Here’s what CBP says recently happened at the nation’s southern border in Laredo, Texas, as described here:

U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) Office of Field Operations (OFO) officers working outbound operations at the Juarez Lincoln Bridge, seized over $261,000 in two separate, unrelated incidents.

The first enforcement action occurred on Jan. 24, when officers assigned to outbound operations selected a 2009 Kia Sorento traveling to Mexico for inspection. The vehicle was driven by a 53-year-old female United States citizen. Upon physical inspection of the subject’s personal belongings, packages containing $65,560 in undeclared currency were discovered.

The second enforcement action occurred on Jan. 29, when officers intercepted a 2006 Ford F-150 traveling to Mexico and selected it for inspection. The vehicle was driven by a 34-year-old male Mexican citizen. Upon physical inspection of the subject’s vehicle, packages containing $195,731 in undeclared currency were discovered.

The seizures combined totaled $261,291.

The currency and vehicles were seized by CBP. Both drivers were arrested, and the cases were turned over to U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement-Homeland Security Investigations (ICE-HSI) special agents for further investigation.

Has Laredo CBP seized your money?

Has Laredo CBP seized your money? If so, we can help. Read our helpful customs money seizure legal guide (or watch the videos) and contact us for a free currency seizure consultation by clicking the contact buttons on this page.

$23,000 in Bulk Cash Hidden in Backpack Seized by Dulles CBP

Dulles Airport Customs Seizes $23k in Unreported Currency

Since the removal of travel restrictions international travel has increased; add to that, the US holiday of Thanksgiving, and we should expect to see a significant rise in CBP enforcement activities. In the story below, which (of course) takes place at Dulles Airport, we have a tale of a married couple traveling to Ghana who did not accurately report the currency, and who had their money seized by customs at the airport.

As always with the stories from Dulles, it seems, there is enough information to allege bulk cash smuggling, which leads to higher penalties. Here is the story:

STERLING, Virginia — The seizure of … $23,000 in unreported currency on Monday offer a glimpse into the breadth of enforcement responsibilities that Customs and Border Protection officers carry out daily at Washington Dulles International Airport.

CBP officers seized the unreported currency while conducting enforcement operations on a Ghana-bound flight. A married couple reported to CBP officers that they possessed a combined $10,500.

$23,000 in Bulk Cash Hidden in Backpack Seized by Dulles CBP
Officers found the concealed
currency inside the carry-on
bag’s zippered liner.

While inspecting the couple’s carry-on bag, officers discovered an envelope concealed behind the carry-on bag’s zippered liner. Officers verified the couple’s combined currency at $23,641. Officers seized the currency for violating U.S. currency reporting laws and then released the couple with $641as a humanitarian relief.

CBP is not releasing the travelers’ names because none were criminally charged.

“The seizures of . . . unreported currency may seem innocuous at first; however, they illustrate the resolve and commitment that Customs and Border Protection officers and specialists dte every day to enforce our nation’s laws, to enhance our nation’s economic vitality through lawful international trade and travel, and to help keep our citizens safe,” said Daniel Escobedo, CBP Area Port Director for the Area Port of Washington, D.C.

CBP officers remind travelers that there is no limit to how much currency or other monetary instruments they may bring to or take out of the United States; however, federal law [31 USC 5316] requires travelers to report all currency $10,000 or greater to a CBP officer.

Read more about federal currency reporting requirements.

CBP officers have observed that smuggled bulk currency may be the proceeds of illicit activity, such as proceeds from the sales of dangerous drugs or revenue from financial crimes and work to disrupt currency smuggling. CBP seized an average of about $386,000 every day last year in unreported or illicit currency along our nation’s borders.

Has Dulles CBP seized your cash?

If Dulles CBP has seized your cash, we urge you to call us for a consultation before considering doing it yourself. You probably will not be happy with the outcome if you do, based on Dulles’ aggressive posture in most cases. Read our trusted customs money seizure legal guide (or watch the videos) and can contact us for a free currency seizure consultation by clicking the contact buttons on this page.

A wad of cash left behind in an airplane seat, later seized by U.S. Customs & Border Protection

Baltimore CBP Seizes $82K in Cash from Traveler to Jamaica

Baltimore Customs officers seized cash from 4 men heading back to their native Jamaica for not reporting it; apparently, 3 of them were on the same flight. In that case, from the story below it sounds like two of the men made it onto the plane without filing the report.

A third man blew their cover, by telling the officers he was traveling with them.

The officers then entered the plane, found the other two men, and one of them had put his money into the pocket on the seat in front of him. It looks as though CBP is consider that bulk cash smuggling.

In all cases, the money was taken by CBP and seized. The men will have to respond to the notice of seizure in order to get their cash back, and prove the money came from a legitimate source, and had a legitimate intended use.

You can read the full story here.

BALTIMORE – U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) officers at Baltimore Washington International Thurgood Marshall Airport (BWI) continue to encounter travelers who refuse to comply with federal currency reporting laws after officers seized a combined $82,533 from four men, all heading to Montego Bay, Jamaica recently.

[ . . . ]

In the most recent case on August 6, CBP officers seized a combined $59,587 from three men, ages 34, 33 and 25. The men individually reported to CBP officers that they had $7,500, $8,000, and $8,500; however, CBP officers discovered that the men $18,522, $21,560, and $19,505, respectively.

CBP officers interviewed the first man and learned that he was traveling with the other two who officers asked to deplane the aircraft. Interestingly, CBP officers found one man’s unreported currency concealed in the seatback of his assigned seat.

Additionally, on August 4, CBP officers seized $22,946 from a 75-year-old man who told officers that he possessed $12,000.

CBP is not releasing the names of either man because none were criminally charged. All four men are naturalized U.S. citizens or lawful permanent residents who were born in Jamaica.

“The disregard that some travelers have for our nation’s currency reporting laws is troubling and very unwise, especially when you consider that travelers can keep all their currency simply by just being honest and declaring the full amount to a Customs and Border Protection officer,” said Keith Fleming, Acting Director of Field Operations for CBP’s Baltimore Field Office.

CBP officers have observed that unreported currency can be proceeds from illicit activities, such as financial fraud and narcotics smuggling, and work hard to disrupt the export of these illicit revenues.

During inspections, CBP officers ensure that travelers fully understand federal currency reporting requirements and offer travelers multiple opportunities to accurately report all currency and monetary instruments they possess before examining a traveler’s carryon or checked baggage.

Have you had cash seized by Baltimore CBP?

If CBP Baltimore seized your cash, you need a lawyer. Read our trusted customs money seizure legal guide and can contact us for a free currency seizure consultation by clicking the contact buttons on this page.

Detroit Field Offices 2020 Statistics

CBP Detroit Cash Seizures Decline by Nearly 60% in Pandemic

In fiscal year 2019 (October 2018 through October 2019), CBP seized $7.8 million in cash from (most unsuspecting) travelers at Detroit Metro Airport, the Ambassador Bridge, Detroit-Windsor Tunnel, and the Blue Water Bridge in Port Huron.

Last fiscal year (October 2019 through October 2020), however, CBP seized nearly 60% less than 2019! CBP seized only $4.6 million in cash in 2020. A marked decrease, likely due to the travel restrictions for basically 7 months of the entirety of the fiscal year. Here’s the story:

DETROIT — U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) personnel operating at the multiple ports of entry throughout Michigan had an unprecedented year, with a 1,736 percent increase in seized marijuana and 227 percent increase in seized firearms amid public health concerns and restricted travel conditions related to the global Covid-19 pandemic.

The Detroit Field Office includes the Ambassador Bridge and Detroit Windsor Tunnel, the Blue Water Bridge in Port Huron, the International Bridge in Sault Ste. Marie, and Detroit Metropolitan Airport.

Drug enforcement operations at Michigan’s five ports of entry netted the following totals: 9,059 pounds of marijuana – a 1,726 percent increase when compared with last fiscal year; 211 pounds of cocaine, more than 1.5 pounds of methamphetamines; and a little more than 15 pounds of fentanyl.

A total of 203 firearms were seized – a 227 percent increase from last year – along with 5,334 rounds of ammunition.

The amount of undeclared currency seized totaled $4.6 million dollars.

A total of 225 individuals were arrested in Fiscal Year 2020 for reasons to include: narcotics smuggling, human smuggling, firearms violations, and fraud.

Finally, our Agriculture Specialists intercepted 2,010 pests. Their diligence and expertise is crucial in preventing foreign pests from causing harm to the agriculture industry.

“This past year the men and women of CBP worked through some of the most adverse conditions that we have ever asked them to work through especially here in Detroit,” said Christopher Perry, Director of Field Operations for CBP in Detroit. “I am simply amazed at how our officers steadfastly enforced the laws of the United States, while fostering our nation’s economic security through lawful international trade and travel during the greatest pandemic my generation has seen.”

We have noticed an uptick in seizure cases again as the pandemic wanes, and people get vaccinated and become more comfortable (and able) to travel. Fiscal year 2021, which began in October 2020 and ends on October 2021, will still be majorly affected by pandemic. Less travel means less cash seizures by CBP.

Has Detroit CBP seized your cash?

If CBP in Detroit seized your cash, you need a lawyer. Read our trusted customs money seizure legal guide and can contact us for a free currency seizure consultation by clicking the contact buttons on this page.

 

Piles of cash seized by CBP at Detroit Metro Airport

CBP Detroit Seizes $60K Headed to Amsterdam

Customs officers at Detroit Metro Airport seized more than $60,000 from a woman who was traveling to Amsterdam, who reported having only $1,000 but in fact had more than $60,000 concealed in a bag of women’s “Always” ultra-thin menstrual pads.

Customs in Detroit is, as far as I can tell, always one of the leading ports across in terms of enforcement of the currency reporting violations, even though it’s not widely ‘advertised’ through Customs news releases. For instance, Dulles airport does not have nearly the volume of cash seizures as Detroit, yet Dulles is always in the news.

Here’s the story about the Detroit cash seizure:

ROMULUS, Mich. – U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) Office of Field Operations Officers at Detroit Metropolitan Airport, conducting outbound enforcement operations encountered a female passenger headed to Amsterdam on February 3 with more than $60,000 in undeclared U.S. currency.

The female passenger initially reported to CBP officers conducting outbound examinations, she was only carrying $1,000. During an inspection of her baggage, Officers found bundles of cash inside envelopes, concealed in packaging used to house sanitary napkins. Officers seized the money as a result of the passenger violating currency reporting requirements.

“CBP enforces these regulations to combat money laundering or other criminal offenses,” said Port Director Robert Larkin. “I’m proud of our officers and the work they do to interrupt currency smuggling operations and illegal activities daily.”

The full story is available here.

Have you had a customs money seizure at Detroit Metro Airport?

If you have a customs money seizure at Detroit Metro airport, don’t do it yourself. Cash seizure cases are often packed with with difficulties and unforeseen challenges. Instead of risking forfeiture and the total loss of your money, do the smart thing and call us for a free currency seizure consultation and make use of the free customs money seizure legal guide we publish on this website.

piles of money seized by CBP at dulles airport en route to Netherlands

CBP Seizes $66,000 in Cash from 2 Travelers

Dulles CBP again seized unreported money over the last weekend. The first was on an arriving flight from Dubai who filled out a form reporting $10,070, but in fact, she had almost $40,000 (oops).

The second was a man leaving for Morocco who reported $10,000 (and CBP helped him fill out a form for the $10,000 (why? it’s not more than $10,000…); but he actually had $26,000.

Here’s the story from CBP itself.

On Friday, CBP officers inspected a U.S. citizen female traveler after she arrived on a flight from Dubai, United Arab Emirates. The woman told CBP officers that she possessed $10,070 and completed a Treasury FINCEN-105 form for that amount. CBP officers then discovered a combined $39,536 in the woman’s carry-on bag and purse. CBP officers seized the currency and released the woman.

On Sunday, CBP officers inspected a U.S. lawful permanent resident male at the departure gate for a flight destined to Casablanca, Morocco. The man reported that he possessed $10,000. Officers assisted the man in completing a FINCEN-105 form to report his $10,000. During a subsequent examination of the man’s carryon bag and jacket, officers discovered a total of $26,000. Officers provided the man $1,300 for humanitarian relief and released him.

“Grossly under-reporting on both the Treasury currency reporting form and verbally to a Customs and Border Protection officer during an inspection is a clear violation of our nation’s currency reporting laws,” said Keith Fleming, Acting Director of Field Operations for CBP’s Baltimore Field Office. “CBP encourages travelers to truthfully report all currency and monetary instruments that they possess to a CBP officer.”

Although there is no limit to the amount of money that travelers may carry when crossing U.S. borders, federal law [31 U.S.C. 5316] requires that travelers report currency or monetary instruments in excess of $10,000 to a CBP officer at the airport, seaport, or land border crossing when entering or leaving the United States. Read more about currency reporting requirements.

An individual may petition for the return of seized currency, but the petitioner must prove that the source and intended use of the currency was legitimate.

The original link is here.

Has Dulles CBP seized your cash?

If Dulles CBP has seized your cash, we urge you to call us for a consultation before considering doing it yourself. You probably will not be happy with the outcome if you do, based on Dulles’ aggressive posture in most cases. Read our trusted customs money seizure legal guide (or watch the videos) and can contact us for a free currency seizure consultation by clicking the contact buttons on this page.

piles of money seized by CBP at dulles airport en route to Netherlands

Dulles CBP Seizes $47,000 Cash From Netherlands-bound Traveler

Dulles CBP officers seized more than $47,440 from a woman U.S. citizen who was traveling to the Netherlands. This is an interesting story and markedly different from the usual seizure story; when the woman was asked how much she was carrying, she showed them a copy of a FinCen 105 form she actually filed on the same day.

If the story is accurate, she reported on the FinCen105 that she was carrying $10,000. Of course, it would not make sense to report carrying $10,000 on a FinCen105 even if it was true because the form is only properly filed when you travel with more than $10,000.

Perhaps her failure to comprehend this caused her to be flagged and scrutinized by CBP, because she did something that doesn’t make any sense. If there is an innocent explanation to this and she was not actually trying to skate past CBP with an extra $37,000 by filing a FinCen105 for a lower amount, then my guess is she misunderstood how to fill out the form. Just because your a U.S. citizen doesn’t mean your English is great or your very smart.

Also, I wonder if she just had a connecting flight at Amsterdam Airport Schiphol, or if she really was just heading to the Netherlands. I don’t see much seizure activity to Western European nations, so it would be a surprise. Here’s the full story (linked here):

STERLING, Va. – U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) officers seized more than $47,000 from a Netherlands-bound traveler Friday at Washington Dulles International Airport.

Officers asked the traveler, a female U.S. citizen, how much currency she possessed. She reported $10,000 and showed officers a FINCEN-105 currency reporting form she filed with CBP earlier Friday. Officers asked if she had any additional currency and she repeated that she was transporting a total of $10,000.

CBP officers then examined her carryon bag and discovered $47,440. Officers seized the currency and returned $1,740 to the traveler for humanitarian purposes, then released her to continue her trip.

CBP is not releasing the woman’s name because she was not criminally charged.

“Grossly under reporting on both the Treasury currency reporting form and to a Customs and Border Protection officer during inspection is a clear violation of our nation’s currency reporting laws,” said Keith Fleming, Acting Director of Field Operations for CBP’s Baltimore Field Office. “Travelers must truthfully report all currency and other monetary instruments that they possess to a CBP officer.”

Although there is no limit to the amount of money that travelers may carry when crossing U.S. borders, federal law [31 U.S.C. 5316] requires that travelers report currency or monetary instruments in excess of $10,000 to a CBP officer at the airport, seaport, or land border crossing when entering or leaving the United States.

During inspections, CBP officers ensure that travelers fully understand federal currency reporting requirements and offer travelers multiple opportunities to accurately report all currency and monetary instruments they possess before examining a traveler’s carryon or checked baggage.

Consequences for violating U.S. currency reporting laws are severe; penalties may include seizure of most or all of the traveler’s currency, and potential criminal charges. On average, CBP seized about $207,000 every day in unreported or illicit currency along our nation’s borders. Learn more about what CBP accomplished during “A Typical Day” in 2019.

An individual may petition for the return of seized currency, but the petitioner must prove that the source and intended use of the currency was legitimate.

Has Dulles CBP seized your cash?

If Dulles CBP has seized your cash, we urge you to call us for a consultation before considering doing it yourself. You probably will not be happy with the outcome if you do, based on Dulles’ aggressive posture in most cases. Read our trusted customs money seizure legal guide (or watch the videos) and can contact us for a free currency seizure consultation by clicking the contact buttons on this page.

Cash Hidden Inside Envelope Seized on Export by CBP

CBP Miami Intercepts Money Exports

CBP Miami made some significant cash seizures in outbound cargo shipments, which in this case were heading toward Costa Rica.

Just as it is illegal to hand-carry more than $10,000 out of the country without reporting it on form Fincen 105, so too is it illegal to ship it out of the country without reporting it.

In this case, one packaged contained $29k, and the other $19k. Both were destined for Costa Rica.

Here’s the story:

MIAMI – U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) officers had a busy week seizing … money attempted to be exported from the United States through Miami International Airport (MIA).

Last week, CBP officers assigned to the Outbound Enforcement Team at MIA intercepted … $48,000.00 in US currency, in different outbound shipments of cargo.

The shipments of contraband originated from the eastern region of the U.S. and were destined to …. Costa Rica.

      • On May 15, officers seized $29,000.00 in US Currency. The cash was concealed within magazines and parcels destined for Costa Rica. 
      • On May 15, officers seized $19,000.00 in US Currency in a second shipment. The cash was concealed within magazines, book and documents also destined for Costa Rica.

“The outbound cargo environment in Miami is the gateway to the Caribbean and South America, in which criminal enterprises attempt to use transportation routes traffic drugs, guns and money,” said Christopher D. Matson, CBP Port Director at Miami International Airport. “CBP’s Outbound Enforcement Team continues to conduct outbound sweeps of cargo resulting in significant seizures that disrupt dangerous criminal networks.”

CBP officers screen international travelers and cargo and search for illicit narcotics, unreported currency, weapons, counterfeit consumer goods, prohibited agriculture, and other illicit products that could potentially harm the American public, U.S. businesses, and our nation’s safety and economic vitality.

Has CBP seized your money?

Has CBP seized your money? If so, we can help. Read our helpful customs money seizure legal guide (or watch the videos) and contact us for a free currency seizure consultation by clicking the contact buttons on this page.

$21,000 in cash seized by CBP at Washington-Dulles seized for currency reporting violations

Traveler Fails to Report $21,000 Seized by CBP

Yesterday, CBP publicized a cash seizure from a female traveler who failed to report $21,000 in cash she was transporting before boarding her plane at Dulles airport.

The woman, bound for Pakistan via Turkey, verbally reported carrying $6,000. Thereafter, a customs officer searched her bags and discovered a total of $21,255.

This is a classic violation of 31 USC 5316, where a person fails to report cash being transported by them to CBP. A report of currency must be made on form FinCEN 105 and presented to CBP before departure. It is not enough to verbally report the money when asked.

CBP will also surely allege that this is also an instance of bulk cash smuggling, because she was provided with an opportunity to disclosure the full amount of money she carried, but only reported $6,000. They later had to find the full $21,255 in her bag.

Here’s the full story, from CBP:

STERLING, Va. – U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) officers seized $21,255 in unreported currency from a U.S. woman destined to Pakistan Friday at Washington Dulles International Airport.

While CBP officers conducted an outbound inspection of passengers on a Turkey-bound flight, officers encountered the woman and asked how much currency she possessed. She reported $6,000 and confirmed that she understood federal currency reporting requirements. Officers discovered several envelopes in her carry-on baggage with a total of $21,255 in U.S. currency. Officers released $255 to the woman for humanitarian purposes and seized $21,000 for violating federal currency reporting requirements.

It is legal to carry large sums of currency into or out of the United States. However, federal law requires that travelers who possess $10,000 or more in currency or other monetary instruments must report it all to a CBP officer at the airport, seaport, or land border crossing when entering or leaving the country. Read more about currency reporting requirements.

Consequences for violating U.S. currency reporting laws are severe; penalties may include seizure of most or all of the traveler’s currency, and potential criminal charges.

Have you had money seized by CBP?

If CBP has seized your cash, you need a lawyer. Read our trusted customs money seizure legal guide and can contact us for a free currency seizure consultation by clicking the contact buttons on this page.

Stacks of cash and a pile of envelopes seized by U.S. Customs & Border Protection

$15k in Cash Not Reported to Customs at Dulles Airport, Seized

CBP seized $15,000 in cash that was being transported to Ghana from a traveler at Dulles Airport.

The story, quoted below, references some “travel tips” shared by CBP Dulles. Apparently, the ‘travel tips’ advise about “truthfully report[ing] all currency they possess to a CBP officer during inspection.”

That’s a good idea, but the best idea is to report it to a CBP officer before inspection, as the law requires. 

In this money seizure encounter, a dog alerted the currency and CBP asked him how much he carried after they “explained the currency reporting requirements” (i.e., report what you carry if more than $10,000).

At this point, the violation of the currency reporting requirements has occurred. The money has not been reported to CBP, and the man likely is about to leave the United States. That’s all that’s necessary to violate the reporting requirement under 31 USC 5316.

The man reported he had $8,000, verbally and in writing.This is the man then digging himself into a deeper hole with CBP. Perhaps they would look past his initial failure to report if he accurately reported how much he was carrying when he was asked by CBP, after the dog alerted to money. Maybe, maybe not. But at this point, incorrectly stating the amount of cash you have on you is not going to end well; it will end in a seizure of the money.

The story, as reported by CBP, follows:

STERLING, Virginia — U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) recently issued travel tips for international travel through Washington Dulles International Airport. Chiefly among those tips is for travelers to truthfully report all currency they possess to a CBP officer during inspection. 

A traveler leaving for Ghana Wednesday learned that lesson when CBP officers seized $15,415 of unreported currency he had in his possession.

While working a departure gate at Dulles airport, a CBP currency detector dog alerted to a carry-on bag that a U.S. citizen man carried. Officers explained the currency reporting requirements to the man and the man reported verbally and in writing that he possessed $8,000. An examination revealed that the man possessed $15,415. Officers seized the currency and returned $115 to the man as a humanitarian release, and then released the traveler. 

It is perfectly legal to carry large sums of currency in or out of the United States. However, federal law requires that travelers who possess $10,000 or more in currency or other monetary instruments must report it all to a CBP officer at the airport, seaport, or land border crossing when entering or leaving the country.